MDST 4200

This course will examine the ways in which different mass media help to define our cultural ideas about gender differences and the ways in which feminist scholars have responded to these definitions by criticizing existing media images and by creating some alternatives of their own. The course will examine the notion that the mass media might influence our development as gendered individuals and consider different forms of feminist theory.

This course fulfills the second writing requirement.

 

MDST 3306

The focus of this class will be on viewings and analyses of films featuring images of teens produced between 1930 and the present, focusing on the following questions: what is adolescence (and how has it been defined in American film)? What is the range of experience that characterizes American adolescence across gender, race, and class lines? How does it make sense to think about the social influence of films on individuals and society?

JPTR 3390

This seminar will examaine modern Japanese women’s fiction and critical essays that represent a primer to Japan’s conflicted socio-cultural-gender history in light of the country’s complex psychological relationship to the West. The focus will be on a Japan that is far from the stereotypical image of a conformist and homogenerous society. No prior knowledge of Japanese language or literature is required.

HIUS 3612

Studies the evolution of women’s roles in American society with particular attention to the experiences of women of different races, classes, and ethnic groups.
This course fulfills the Second Writing Requirement.

HISA 3121

Surveys the evolving definitions and roles of women in the major social and cultural traditions of South Asia, i.e., India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, and Sri Lanka.

HIEU 3342

Explores the changing constructions of gender roles and their concrete consequences for women and men in society; uses primary texts and secondary studies from the 17th century to the present.

HIEU 3341

Explores the changing constructions of gender roles and their concrete consequences for women and men in society; uses primary texts and secondary studies from late antiquity through the Reformation.

ENMC 3160

Studies fiction, poetry, and non-fiction written by women in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. For more details on this class, please visit the English department website at http://www.engl.virginia.edu/courses.

ENEC 3200

During the eighteenth century, social, economic, and technological developments converged to alter the ways in which texts were produced and consumed. The result of these innovations was a new “print culture” that offered women the opportunity to step onto the public stage as professional authors for the first time. Female authors, nevertheless, remained intensely aware of their “delicate situation” within the literary public sphere.

ENCR 3810

Introduces current feminist scholarship in a variety of areas literature, history, film, anthropology, and psychoanalysis, among others pairing feminist texts with more traditional ones. Features guest speakers and culminates in an interdisciplinary project. For more details on this class, please visit the English department website at http://www.engl.virginia.edu/courses.

Pages