Charlotte J. Patterson

Patterson

434-982-2961
patterson@virginia.edu

Women, Gender & Sexuality

101 Levering Hall

PO Box 400172

Charlottesville, VA 224904-4172

WGS Office Hours by appointment

B.A., Pomona College

M.A., Stanford University

Ph.D., Stanford University

 

Charlotte J. Patterson (Ph.D. Stanford University) is a Professor in the Department of Psychology and in the Center for Children, Families, and the Law, and is Director of the interdisciplinary program Women, Gender & Sexuality at the University of Virginia. She is also a faculty member and research scientist at the Fenway Institute's Center for Population Research in LGBT Health in Boston. Her research focuses on the psychology of sexual orientation, with an emphasis on sexual orientation, human development, and family lives. In the context of her research, Patterson has worked with children, adolescents, couples, and families; she is best known for her studies of child development in the context of lesbian- and gay-parented families. The author or editor of many books and articles, she has also won a number of awards, including the American Psychological Association's Award for Distinguished Contributions to Research in Public Policy. She recently served as a member of the Committee on Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Health Issues and Research Gaps convened by the U.S. Institute of Medicine; their report, entitled The Health of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender People: Building a Foundation for Better Understanding, was released in March, 2011. Her most recent work is the co-edited Handbook of Psychology and Sexual Orientation (Oxford University Press, 2013).
 

Selected Publications:

Handbook of Psychological and Sexual Orientation (Oxford University Press, 2013)
Lesbian, Gay and Bisexual Identities and Youth (Oxford University Press, 2001)
Lesbian, Gay and Bisexual Identities in Families (Oxford University Press, 1998)
Lesbian, Gay and Bisexual Identities Over the Lifespan (Oxford University Press, 1995)

 

 

 

Personal Website:  http://people.virginia.edu/~cjp/

 

Karlin Luedtke

Luedtke

434-924-8864
kl5k@virginia.edu

The Undergraduate College of Arts & Sciences

264 Monroe Hall

PO Box 400133

Charlottesville, Virginia  22904-4133

B.A., Mount Holyoke College
M.A., University of Virginia
Ph.D., University of Virginia

 

Karlin Luedtke is Assistant Professor of Women, Gender & Sexuality and Association Dean for the International Residential College. She also serves as the Director of Student Academic Support and the Transition Program Program and she coordinates academic support programs and services for students in the College of Arts and Sciences.  Luedtke’s areas of research include the  sociology of gender and sociology of mass communications, popular culture, classical social theory, and feminist theory.  In recognition of her academic achievement and dedicated service to the University community as a graduate instructor, she was elected to UVA's Raven Society in 2000.  In 2007, she was an Invited Speaker for UVA's Unforgettable Lectures Series, giving a talk entitled “So Hoo's a Feminist Anyway?” In April 2008 she presented a paper at the Southeastern Women’s Studies Conference, titled “Making Sense of Pornography: Gendered Interpretations of Sexually Explicit Images.”

 

Bonnie Hagerman

Hagerman 2015

434-982-2961
bmh9m@virginia.edu

Women, Gender & Sexuality
103 Levering Hall
PO Box 400172
Charlottesville, Virginia  22904-4172

Spring 2018 Office Hours: Wednesday 11am-3:00pm, and by appointment

Summer 2018: By appointment

Fall 2018: Wednesday 9:30am-1:30pm, and by appointment

Education

B.A., Princeton University

M.A., Ohio University

Ph.D., Ohio University

 

Bonnie Hagerman graduated cum laude from Princeton University in 1991 with a B.A. in Anthropology. After teaching high school social studies and history for five years, she pursued graduate studies at Ohio University with an intent to combine her interests in American history, feminism, and sports. Her resulting Ph.D. dissertation, “Skimpy Coverage,” examines Sports Illustrated’s treatment of sportswomen in its pages from 1954 to 2000. Hagerman began teaching for WGS in 2008, and has taught “Women, Gender, and Sport: A History of American Female Athletes” every year since that time.

Selected Publications:

Skimpy Coverage: Female Athletes in Sports Illustrated, 1954 to the Present (under review)

Amanda Davis

Davis

434-982-2926
ajd7y@virginia.edu

Women, Gender & Sexuality

105 Levering Hall

PO Box 400172

Charlottesville, VA 22904-4172

Office Hours Fall 2017: Thursday 10:30am-12:00 pm, by appointment

B.A., Eastern Illinois University

M.A., University of Florida

Ph.D., University of Florida

 

Amanda Davis received her Ph.D. in English, as well as a Ph.D. Concentration in Women’s Studies and Gender Research from the University of Florida, where she taught for eleven years prior to joining the WGS Program. Her areas of research include incarcerated women, women and poverty, transnational feminism, literature and theory by women of color, women’s autobiographies, and global violence against women. Her own work in these areas has been published in such journals as Frontiers, MELUS, Women’s Studies Quarterly, and Feminist Theory, as well as a number of reference collections focused on African American literature and history.

 

Davis was awarded a Jacob K. Javits Fellowship as a graduate student, and was recognized as a Lincoln Academy Student Laureate for the state of Illinois. She was honored with the University of Florida's Calvin A. VanderWerf award in teaching. In 2014, she was an invited speaker for "The Best of UVA: A Collection of Unforgettable Lectures."  Her talk was entitled "On the Stones We Can Bring: Choosing Intention."

 

Selected Publications:

Writing from the Women’s Prison: Autobiographical Texts by Incarcerated Women (in progress)

 

Farzaneh Milani

Milani

434-243-4930
fmm2z@virginia.edu

Middle Eastern & South Asian Languages & Cultures
131 New Cabell Hall
PO Box 400781
Charlottesville, VA 22904

Women, Gender & Sexuality
201 Levering Hall
PO 400172
Charlottesville, VA 22904

Office Hours: On Sabbatical

B.A., California State University

M.A., University of California, Los Angeles

Ph.D. University of California, Los Angeles

 

Farzaneh Milani completed her graduate studies in Comparative Literature in 1979 at the University of California in Los Angeles. Her dissertation, “Forugh Farrokhzad: A Feminist Perspective” was a critical study of the poetry of a pioneering Iranian poet. A past president of the Association of Middle Eastern Women Studies in America, Milani was the recipient of All University Teaching Award in 1998 and nominated for Virginia Faculty of the Year in 1999.

Milani has published over 100 articles, epilogues, forewords, and afterwords in Persian and in English. She has served as the guest editor for two special issues of Nimeye-Digar, Persian Language Feminist Journal (on Simin Daneshvar and Simin Behbahani), IranNameh (on Simin Behbahani), and Iranian Studies: Journal of the International Society for Iranian Studies (on Simin Behbahani). She has written for the New York Times, the Washington Post, Christian Science Monitor, Ms. Magazine, Readers Digest, USA Today, and N.P.R.’s All Things Considered. She has presented more than 150 lectures nationally and internationally. A former director of Studies in Women and Gender, Milani is Professor of Persian Literature and Women Studies at the University of Virginia in Charlottesville. She was a Carnegie Fellow (2006-2007).

Selected Publications:

Words, Not Swords: Iranian Women Writers and the Freedom of Movement (Syracuse University Press, 2011)

An Iranian Icarus: The Life and Poetry of Forugh Farrokhzad (in progress)

The Gender of Modernity and Counter-Modernity in Iran (forthcoming)

A Cup of Sin: Selected Poems of Simin Behbahani, with Kaveh Safa (Syracuse University Press, 1999)

Veils and Words: The Emerging Voices of Iranian Women Writers (Syracuse University Press, 1992)

Geeta Patel

Geeta Patel at the Godrej India Culture Lab

434-924-3452
ghp5v@virginia.edu

Middle Eastern & South Asian Languages & Cultures

New Cabell Hall

PO Box 400781

Charlottesville, Virginia 22904-4781

 

 

B.A., Wellesley College

M.A., Columbia University

Ph.D., Columbia University

Geeta Patel (Ph.D., Columbia University) is Associate Professor, Middle Eastern & South Asian Languages & Cultures and Women, Gender & Sexuality. Her book, Lyrical Movements, Historical Hauntings: Gender, Colonialism and Desire in Miraji’s Urdu Poetry (Stanford University Press, 2002), reads a renegade writer through nationalism, gender, sexuality, and grief in twentieth-century Urdu poetic movements. Her work, circling around prose and poetry in Sanskrit, Urdu, Hindi, Braj and Awadhi, includes translation and short personal pieces. Her theoretical stance, informed by translation theory from South Asian studies, sexuality studies and gender theory, postcolonial, diaspora and subaltern historiography, and crossover questions from the history of science, is fashioned in her most recent manuscript Gendering the Global Nation. Her current project, Financing Selves, on risk, insurance and pensions in South Asia, opens with the early East India Company archives and closes with labor movements in contemporary Sri Lanka.

Selected Publications:

Gendering the Global Nation (WomenUnlimited)

Lyrical Movements, Historical Hauntings (Stanford University Press, 2002)

Lisa Shutt

Shutt

434-924-8889
lt7q@virginia.edu

Carter G. Woodson Institute for African American and African Studies
108 Minor Hall
PO Box 400162
Charlottesville, Virginia  22904-4162
 

B.A., Bucknell University
M.A., University of Chicago
M.A., University of Virginia
Ph.D., University of Virginia

Lisa Shutt earned her Ph.D. in Cultural Anthropology at the University of Virginia in 2010 after earning her M.A. at the University of Chicago. In addition to holding a multi-year position as an association dean, Shutt has also taught for several years in UVA’s Department of Anthropology and in several of the University’s interdisciplinary programs including Women, Gender & Sexuality, the Carter G. Woodson Institute for African-American and African Studies, Global Development Studies, and Media Studies.  Ms. Shutt’s research is located in the Central African nation of Gabon, where she examines local understandings about citizenship and national belonging in the city at the center of Gabon’s oil industry, Port-Gentil. She finds that the idea of a Gabonese national identity is frequently rejected by the citizenry despite being clearly observable in the performances that structure everyday life. More generally, Ms. Shutt’s research interests include transnational studies, colonialism/post-coloniality, media representations of Africa/race in the US, foodways and the history of anthropology.  She is a Faculty Fellow with Hereford Residential College.

Lisa Speidel

Speidel

434-924-7786
las7p@virginia.edu

Women, Gender & Sexuality

207 Levering Hall

PO Box 400172

Charlottesville, VA 22904-4172

Fall 2017 Office Hours: Monday 12:45-1:45pm and by appointment

B.A., Earlham College

M.Ed., University of Virginia

Ph.D., University of Virginia

Lisa Speidel has worked in the Charlottesville community for 24 years in multiple positions related to women, gender and sexuality studies. Her outreach services at the Sexual Assault Resource Agency (SARA) included training programs at UVA and working directly with sexual assault peer education groups on Grounds.  Her work and research focuses on examining the role of masculinity, healthy sexuality, gender based violence and the intersection of racism and other forms of systemic oppression. She also teaches women’s self-defense classes both in the community and as a credit-based class at UVA, and is developing a new self-defense program that focuses on acquaintance assault. At present she is working on an anthology that encompasses the unheard voices of navigating a sexually confusing culture. 

 

Publications:

Speidel, Lisa (2014) , My Hips, Butt and Thighs Are My Friends, Huffington Post, April 24. http://www.huffingtonpost.com/lisa-speidel/my-hips-butt-and-thighs-a_b_5207129.html

Speidel, Lisa (2014) Exploring the Intersection of Race and Gender in Self-Defense Training, Violence Against Women, March 2014, vol. 20 no. 3 309-325.

Speidel, Lisa and Jason Jones, (2013) Mentoring Masculinities at the University of Virginia (publication in the ACPA Standing Committee for Men & Masculinities (SCMM) and NASPA Men and Masculinities Knowledge Community's joint newsletter, The Changing Faces of College Men)

Denise Walsh

D Walsh

434-982-2131
denise@virginia.edu

Department of Politics
S454 Gibson Hall
1540 Jefferson Park Ave
PO Box 400787
Charlottesville, Virginia  22904-4787

Women Gender & Sexuality
202 Levering Hall
PO Box 400177
Charlottesville, VA 22904

Office Hours Fall 2017: By appointment

B.A., Bennington College

M.A., Columbia University

Ph.D, New School of Social Research

Denise Walsh (PhD, New School for Social Research) is Associate Professor of Politics and Women, Gender & Sexuality. Her research focuses on how liberal democracies can become more inclusive and just. Walsh’s current book project, When Rights Go Wrong: Multiculturalism Versus Women’s Rights, challenges the assumption that conflicts between multiculturalism and women’s rights are inevitable. By investigating polygamy in South Africa, native women’s expulsion from their tribe in Canada and the face veil ban in France, Walsh finds that politicians often manufacture conflicts between multiculturalism and women’s rights for their own benefit, and that multiculturalism and women’s rights can be mutually reinforcing. Walsh’s first book, Women’s Rights in Democratizing States: Just Debate and Gender Justice in the Public Sphere (Cambridge University Press, 2010), compares Chile, Poland, and South Africa, and finds that democratic institutions like political parties, legislatures and social movements often obstruct advances in women’s rights.

Walsh's recent publications include “Organizing Women: Diversifying Leadership and Addressing Discrimination in Political Science Departments,” PS: Political Science & Politics (3) 2015: 459-463, co-authored with Carol Mershon; “A Feminist Approach to Quotas and Comparative Politics,” Critical Perspectives on Gender and Politics: Gender Quotas and Comparative Politics, Politics & Gender 9 (3)

2013: 322-328, and "Does the Quality of Democracy Matter for Women's Rights? The Public Sphere and Democratic Transition in Chile and South Africa," (Comparative Political Studies, 2012).  Walsh won the Best Dissertation Prize from the Women in Politics Research Section of the American Political Science Association in 2007, and the Hannah Arendt Award in Politics from the New School for Social Research in 2006. She was a co-winner of the Best Article Prize from the Journal of Southern African Studies in 2006. Walsh’s research has been funded by the National Science Foundation, USAID, the Collegio Carlog Alberto in Italy, and the Dickey Center for International Understanding at Dartmouth, and by many organizations at the University of Virginia.  Walsh teaches courses on identity politics, feminist theory, human rights, and violence against women.

Selected Publications:

“Multiculturalism and Women’s Rights,” The Oxford Handbook of International Political Theory, edited by Chris Brown and Robyn Eckersley (Oxford University Press: forthcoming).

“A Feminist Approach to Quotas and Comparative Politics,” Critical Perspectives on Gender and Politics: Gender Quotas and Comparative Politics, Politics & Gender 9 (3) 2013: 322-328.

“Does the Quality of Democracy Matter for Women’s Rights? The Public Sphere and Democratic Transition in Chile and South Africa,” Comparative Political Studies, 45 (11) 2012: 1323-1350 (lead article, Online First, March 2012).

Women’s Rights in Democratizing States: Just Debate and Gender Justice in the Public Sphere (Cambridge University Press, 2010)

Website:  http://denisewalsh.weebly.com

 

 

 

Kath Weston

Weston Author

434-924-6820
weston@virginia.edu

Department of Anthropology

306 Brooks Hall

PO Box 400120

Charlottesville, Virginia  22904-4120

A.B., University of Chicago

A.M., University of Chicago

A.M., Stanford University

Ph.D., Stanford University

 

Kath Weston’s (Ph.D., Stanford University) current work focuses on political economy, political ecology and environmental issues, historical anthropology, and science studies.  She has also published widely on kinship, gender, and sexuality.  Before coming to the University of Virginia, she taught at Harvard University and Arizona State University.  She has also served as a Visiting Professor at Cambridge University, the University of Tokyo, Brandeis University, Wellesley College, and Olin College.  Dr. Weston has conducted fieldwork and archival research in North America, India, Japan, the United Kingdom, and the Andaman and Nicobar Islands.  She is a longtime member of the National Writers Union and the author of several books.

 

Selected Publications:

The Magic of Capital: A Cultural Critique of Circulation and Generation in Finance (in process)

Traveling Light: On the Road with America’s Poor (Beacon Press, 2008)

Gender in Real Time: Power and Transience in a Visual Age (Psychology Press, 2002)

Long Slow Burn: Sexuality and Social Science (Psychology Press, 1998)

Families We Choose: Lesbians, Gays, Kinship (Columbia University Press, 1997)

Render Me, Gender Me (Columbia University Press, 1996)

The Apprenticeship and Blue Collar System: Putting Women on the Right Track (California State Department of Education, 1982)

Edith "Winx" Lawrence

Edith Lawrence

434-924-0789
wlawrence@virginia.edu

Curry School of Education

223 Bavaro Hall

405 Emmet Street

Charlottesville, Virginia  22904

B.A., Hollins College

Ph.D., Univesrity of Virginia

 

A faculty member in the Curry Programs in Clinical and School Psychology since 1982, Lawrence teachs graduate courses in marital and family theory and therapy, issues facing adolescent girls, and fostering leadership in women. She directs the Young Women Leaders Program, a mentoring program that pairs adolescent girls with college women.  She also directs the Family Empowerment Project, which focuses on both research and clinical work with multi-problem families. 

Lawrence's research focuses on investigating the effects of mentoring on early adolescent girls and college women’s social and academic outcomes, and on improving mentoring experiences for both populations. In addition to evaluating the effectiveness of the Young Women Leaders Program, in particular, her lab is involved in evaluating best practices in group and one-on-one youth mentoring and leadership development. Additionally, she is evaluating the validity and utility of the Family Inventory of resources and Stressors (FIRST) as an assessment tool for multi-problem families.

 

Website:  http://curry.virginia.edu/academics/directory/edith-c.-lawrence

Rae Blumberg

Rae Blumberg

434-924-6527
rblumberg@virginia.edu

Department of Sociology
303 Dynamics Building
P.O. Box 400766
Charlottesville, VA 22904-4766

B.S., Univesrity of Illinois
M.A., Northwetsern University
Ph.D., Northwestern

 
Rae Lesser Blumberg is the William R. Kenan, Jr. Professor of Sociology. She received her Ph.D. from Northwestern in 1970 and joined the Sociology Department at the University of Virginia in 1998. She is also Professor Emerita of Sociology at the University of California, San Diego.
Her academic work revolves around two theories. First is a general theory of gender stratification found in such works as Stratification: Socioeconomic and Sexual Inequality (Wm. C Brown, 1978); "A General Theory of Gender Stratification" (Sociological Theory 1984); and Gender, Family, and Economy: The Triple Overlap (Sage 1991). The second is an evolving theory of gender and economic development as described in such works as "Making the Case for the Gender Variable: Women and the Wealth and Well-being of Nations (U.S.A.I.D. 1989) and EnGENDERing Wealth and Well-being: Empowerment for Global Change, edited by Blumberg, Cathy Rakowski, Irene Tinker and Michael Monteon, (Westview, 1995). Largely in pursuit of her theories, she has worked in over 40 countries on every continent except Antarctica.

 
Selected Publications:
Blumberg, Rae Lesser (with Robert F. Winch, Maria-Pilar Garcia, Margaret T. Gordon and Gay C. Kitson). Familial Organization: Quest for Determinants. New York: The Free Press, 1977.
Blumberg, Rae Lesser, Stratification: Socioeconomic and Sexual Inequality. Dubuque, IA: Wm. C. Brown, 1978.
Gender, Family, and Economy: The Triple Overlap, Newbury Park, CA: Sage, 1991.
Cathy A. Rakowski, Irene Tinker and Michael Monteon (eds.). Engendering Wealth and Well-Being. Boulder, CO: Westview Press, 1995.

Ellen Contini-Morava

Contini-Morava

434-924-6825
elc9j@virginia.edu

Department of Anthropology
204 Brooks Hall
PO Box 400120
Charlottesville, VA 22904-4120

Ph.D., Columbia Univesrity

 
I had an early childhood fantasy that my unique brain wave configuration made me the only person on Earth who would be able to communicate with the space aliens I hoped would show up.  Later I became interested in human languages, but I resisted learning my father’s native language, Italian, until our family moved to Somalia when I was 12 and it turned out that the only middle school in Mogadishu was Italian.  There I also studied Latin and Arabic, and for fun I attended Russian classes that were run by the Soviet embassy for Somalis en route to study in the USSR.  I didn’t learn Somali, though, which was not written then and not formally taught.  This I felt as an unpaid debt that followed me back to the U.S., which led to my later focus on African languages and linguistics.

According to Franz Boas, anthropology’s intellectual forebear, each language is a principle of classification, and its grammar encodes only a subset of the infinite number of meanings that people can imagine wanting to communicate.  Two questions that have inspired most of my research are:  (1) what are the meanings encoded by the grammatical categories of particular languages? and (2) how do people employ these sparse and abstract meanings to convey an infinitely varied set of messages in actual discourse?

My early work was on the meanings expressed by verb tenses and “aspects” (forms indicating ongoing or completed action, as opposed to location in time) in Swahili.  I was intrigued by the fact that Swahili, like other Bantu languages, had a different set of tenses and aspects in the negative from those used in the affirmative.  In my first book I discuss how the negative forms express meanings having to do with defeated expectations, i.e. they say more about what might have been than about what actually happened.  Later I turned to the system of noun classification for which Bantu languages are famous.  These resemble “grammatical genders” such as those found in French or Spanish, except that there are a dozen or more “genders” instead of just two, and the basis for classification has nothing to do with sex/gender.  In this work I have been interested in both why a noun is assigned to one class rather than another (why are hippos, diminutives, and names of languages put into the same class in Swahili?), and what is the communicative function of noun classification in general.  After all, languages like Turkish make do without noun classes, modern English has abandoned them, and English speakers find it an illogical burden to learn the genders of nouns in French or German.  

Noun classes are part of a broader linguistic phenomenon of grammatical classification that shows up in languages as disparate as Chinese and Menominee.  In current work I am exploring the cognitive and communicative functions of these systems in a cross-linguistic study conducted jointly with Marcin Kilarski of Adam Mickiewicz University in Poland, and in a collaborative project with my U.Va. Anthropology colleague Eve Danziger on noun classification in the Mopan Maya language of Belize.

Selected Publications
2012 - The message in the navel: (ir)realis and negation in Swahili. Language Sciences 34 (2): 200-215.
2008 - Human Relationship Terms, Discourse Prominence, and Asymmetrical Animacy in Swahili. Journal of African Languages and Linguistics 29 (2):127-171.
2007 - Swahili Morphology: Morphologies of Asia and Africa. . Alan Kaye, ed. Pp. 1129-1158. Winona Lake, IN: Eisenbrauns .
2006 - The Difference Between Zero and Nothing: Swahili Noun Class Prefixes 5 and 9/10. In Advances in Functional Linguistics: Columbia School Beyond its Origins. Joseph Davis, Radmila Gorup, and Nancy Stern,eds. Pp. 211-222. John Benjamins.
2004 - Cognitive and Communicative Approaches to Linguistic Analysis. (With Robert S. Kirsner and Betsy Rodriguez-Bachiller). Amsterdam/Philadelphia: John Benjamins.

Susan McKinnon

Susie

434-924-6822
sm@virginia.edu

Department of Anthropology

309 Brooks Hall

PO Box 400120

Charlottesville, VA  22904-4120

Ph.D., University of Chicago

 

As a cultural anthropologist, my research and writing have long been focused on issues relating to kinship, marriage, and gender. I am fascinated by their cross-cultural and historical diversity, by their centrality in the structures and dynamics of hierarchy and equality, and by the way scientific texts have transformed their culturally specific manifestations into universal facts of nature.

Selected Publications
2013 - Vital Relations: Modernity and Persistent Life of Kinship. (With Fenella Cannell, eds). Santa Fe: SAR Press.

2008 - Afterward: Adoptive Relations in Theories of Kinship and Modernity.   In Relative Power: Changing Interpretations of Fosterage and Adoption in Pacific Island Societies. Special Issue of Pacific Studies 31(3/4). Jeanette Dickerson-Putman and Judith Schachter, eds.  Pp. 232-247.  

2005 - Complexities: Beyond Nature and Nurture. (With Sydel Silverman, eds). Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

K. Sara Myers

Myers

434-924-3036
ksm8m@virginia.edu

Department of Classics

B007 Cocke Hall

PO Box 400788

Charlottesville, VA 22904-4788

A.B., Oberlin College

Ph.D., Stanford University

Research Interests

My research interests center on Latin literature and its contexts. I am currently working on Roman gardens and the poetics of epic commencement.  I have ongoing interests in the representations of women in ancient literature.

Selected Publications

Books

  • Ovid's Causes: Cosmogony and Aetiology in the Metamorphoses, The University of Michigan Press, 1994.
  • Vertis in usum: Studies in honor of E. Courtney, ed. J. Miller, C. Damon, K. S. Myers, Munich 2002.
  • Ovid Metamorphoses 14. Cambridge Greek and Latin Classics. Cambridge. 2009.

Articles

  • ambiguus vultus: Horatian echoes in Statius’ Achilleid,” forthcoming Materiali e Discussioni per l’analisi dei testi classici 2016.
  • “Representations of Gardens in Roman Literature,” forthcoming in Gardens of the Roman Empire, Cambridge
  • "Statius on Poetic Invocation and Inspiration," in Brill's Companion to Statius, edited by W. J. Dominik, C. E. Newlands, K. Gervais, 31-53. 2015.
  •  “Ovid’s Reception of Ovid in the Exile Poetry,” A Handbook to the Reception of Ovid, eds. C. Newlands and J. Miller, 8-21. Wiley-Blackwell, 2014.
  • "Catullan Contexts in Ovid's Metamorphoses," in Catullus: Poems, Books, Readers. edited by I. Du Quesnay and A. J. Woodman, 239-54. Cambridge, 2012.
  • “Ovid Bibliography” Oxford Bibliographies Online. 2010.
  •  “Docta otia: Garden ownership and configurations of leisure in Statius and Pliny the Younger,” Arethusa 38 (2005) 103-29.
  • "Miranda fides: Poet and Patrons in Paradoxographical Landscapes in Statius’ Silvae" Materiali e Discussioni  44 (2000) 103-38.
  • "The Poet and the Procuress: The Lena in Latin Love Elegy," JRS 86 (1996): 1-21.

Gweneth West

West

434-924-1447
glw2r@virginia.edu

Department of Drama
211 Drama Building
Charlottesville, VA 22904

M.F.A., University of Texas, Austin

 
Gweneth has worked professionally as a costume designer and professor for 30 years, designing over 200 productions, and directing or acting in over 70. She continues to serve as Resident Costume Designer and Costume Director for Heritage Repertory Theatre since 1986 having designed more than 90 productions there. Her work has also been seen in theatres across the country including the Kennedy Center, New York's 42 Street Theatre, Abington Theatre Company,  Lamb's Theatre, Richmond's Theatre Virginia, Norfolk's Virginia Stage. Most recently she designed the world premiere of the new opera, Nosferatu by Alva Hendersen and Dana Gioia, current head of the NEA, for the Performing Arts Series at the University of Tennessee, Chattanooga. A member of the UVa faculty since 1990, Gweneth teaches graduate and undergraduate costume design, history of dress, portfolio and graphics as well as collaboration & creative process for undergraduates. She designs for the department and mentors both graduate and undergraduate designers in productions for the main season. Her work is informed by her participation in many areas of theatre including directing for New Lyric Theatre and for the department. Awarded a UVa Sesquicentennial Associateship in the fall of 2001, Gweneth explored professional and university collections of historic dress  working with reknown curators among them, Jean Dreusedeau, Kent State; Edward Maeder, Historic Deerfield; Ellen Shanley, Fashion Institute of Technology. Gweneth's work as Curator of The Collection of Historic Dress, which is housed in the Department's Costume Program, continues to provide a rare opportunity for students of costume design & technology, history of dress, acting, and various disciplines across the university. Most recently Gweneth and colleague, Marcy Linton, mounted the exhibition "Ragtime 'Inside Out': A study of period garments in preparation of clothes for the stage" for the Virginia Science Museum, Richmond. Future exhibitions are planned for both the Science Museum and The Virginia Museum.Before joining the faculty at UVa, Gweneth served as costume designer at Wayne State University, Detroit and Head of Costume Design and Production teaching costume design and directing at the University of Florida, Gainesville. Dedicated to the education and training of young theatre artists, her former students attend graduate programs, teach in universities, and work in film, television, and theatres from New York to Los Angeles. Active in USITT, ATHE, SETC, and the Costume Society of America, Gweneth currently serves as the KCACTF Design Chair for Region IV.

Eleanor V. Wilson

Ellie Wilson

434-982-2667
evw2u@virginia.edu

Curry School of Education
335 Bavaro Hall
Charlottesville, VA 22904

B.A., Brown University
M.A., Harvard University
Ph.D., University of Virginia

 
I have a long-standing interest in the history of teacher education and have recently completed a history of the Curry School of Education, The Curry School of Education at the University of Virginia, 1905-2005: Preparing Men and Women for leadership in Scientific Educational Work. Additionally, I am interested in the ways in which preservice students can positively impact the learning of the students they work with in their early field placements and have designed several research projects that focus on this area.

Beginning in 2009, I instituted an international teaching student teaching placement at the University of Cambridge. England.  This program takes place during the fall semester and provides elementary preservice students with the opportunity to become visiting members Homerton College at Cambridge while they complete teaching assignments in the city of Cambridge state schools.

Alison Booth

Alison Booth

434-924-7105
ab6j@virginia.edu

Department of English
436 Bryan Hall
PO Box 400121
Charlottesville, VA 22904-4121

B.A., Bennington
M.F.A, Cornell
M.A., Princeton
Ph.D., Princeton

 
I enjoy teaching courses in Victorian fiction, women writers, Gothic, narrative theory, auto/biography, travel, and other topics, uniting my research interests and willingness to adapt technology in the classroom with my insistence on critical and writing skills.  In research, I have expanded my feminist and narratological studies of cultural and literary history in Britain and North America since 1830 into digital humanities and bibliography.  A continuing theme in my books and articles has been the reception history of authors and the construction of collective biographical histories, or prosopographies; this theme informed my first book, on historical concepts of a common life and a female literary tradition in George Eliot and Virginia Woolf and it continues in my explorations of public representations of imagined community such as Mount Rushmore and of cultural tourism, museums, and biography. I have persistently worked across the boundaries of period (nineteenth to twentieth centuries), nationality (particularly transatlantic Anglophone), media and audience (word-image, novel and film, celebrity and popular culture).  My work in narrative theory has focused on life writing and the prevalent form of collections of short biographies (prosopographies), concentrated in my bibliography of collective biographies of women and the related book, How to Make It as a Woman (2004).  The annotated bibliography has been developed as an online site sponsored by the University of Virginia Library, and now forms part of the peer-reviewed NINES digital consortium.  In 2010, with collaborators in Scholars' Lab, we launched a new version of "CBW."  In 2010-2012, as Resident Fellow in the Institute for Advanced Technology in the Humanities, we developed a schema (Biographical Elements and Structure Schema) for comparative analysis of versions of one person's life or short biographies in various types of collection, along with a database of the 8,000 women in the 12,000+ collections in the project.    Meanwhile, I am nearing completion of a book, another exploration of reception, cultural tradition, and collective biographical representation.  Entitled “Writers Revisited: Transatlantic Literary Tourism, House Museums, and Biography,” it focuses on the narratives and performances of visits to the writer's house as tourism and museums evolved along with Anglo-American canons in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.

Mrinalini Chakravorty

mrinalini chakravorty

434-924-6666
mc5je@virginia.edu

Department of English
416 Bryan Hall
PO Box 400121
Charlottesville, VA 22904-4121

B.A., University of Colorado
M.A., University of California, Irvine
Ph.D., University of California, Irvine

 
My research and teaching interests include postcolonial literature and film, studies of race, gender, and sexuality, and cultural studies.  I am particularly interested in the various theoretical intersections between these areas including but not limited to transnational approaches to the study of literary culture, aesthetic responses to globalization, and modes of minority discourse.

I have recently completed a book entitled In Stereotype: South Asia in the Global Literary Imaginary that interrogates a set of commonplaces about hunger, crowdedness, filth, slums, death, migrant flight, out-sourcing and terror that proliferate globally in contemporary Anglophone novels about the Indian subcontinent.  In Stereotype makes the case that such commonplaces about other worlds are crucial to shaping the ethics of global literature. By probing contexts ranging from the independence of the Indian subcontinent, to poverty tourism, civil war, migration, domestic labor, and terrorist radicalism, this book introduces an interpretive lens for reading the ethics of literary representations of cultural and global difference.

I am now working on another book on the cultural politics of hunger, as well as a co-authoring a critical biography of British glam-rock star Freddie Mercury (with Leila Neti of Occidental College).  The Cultural Politics of Hunger situates new global fictions at the crossroads for discerning the imaginative and material charge hunger holds for how we perceive human differences, racial, cultural, gendered, and biopolitical.  In it I argue that a slippery aesthetics of hunger, vacillating between desire and need, provokes urgent reflections on global culture and consumption.

Some Kind of Magic: Freddie Mercury as Postcolonial Performer is situated at the nexus of postcolonial, queer, media, and cultural studies.  This critical biography examines the life and work of rock music icon Freddie Mercury, lead singer of the British glam band Queen, in the social contexts of British colonialism and Thatcherite Britain.
 

Susan Fraiman

Fraiman

434-924-6650
sdf8x@virginia.edu

Department of English
210 Bryan Hall
PO Box 400121
Charlottesville, VA 22904-4121

B.A., Princeton
M.A., Columbia
Ph.D., Columbia

 
My primary interest is in feminist theory and, more generally, issues of gender and sexuality whether in a theoretical context or within primary texts from Mansfield Park to Pulp Fiction.  My book on narratives of female development features chapters on Frances Burney and Jane Austen among others—and Austen is the single figure to whom I find myself returning most frequently.  I have edited the Norton Critical edition of Northanger Abbey and had something to say in print about most of Austen’s novels.   At the same time, my teaching and scholarship have shifted increasingly to consider popular and academic culture in the United States today.  Cool Men and the Second Sex (2003) is a feminist critique of such contemporary artists and intellectuals as Spike Lee, Quentin Tarantino, Andrew Ross, and Edward Said.  As this book suggests, my current interests include recent cinema and the late twentieth-century academy.  Though I continue to focus on narrative forms, today my archive extends from novels, movies, and academic writing to reality television, decorating manuals, and women’s magazines.  I am presently working on a study of marginal forms of domesticity, and my latest article engages with the area of animal studies.

Selected Publications
Cool Men and the Second Sex, Columbia University Press, 2003

Unbecoming Women: British Women Writers and the Novel of Development, Columbia University Press, 1994

Victoria Olwell

434-924-6804
vjo2f@virginia.edu

Department of English
414 Bryan Hall
PO Box 400121
Charlottesville, VA 22904-4121

B.A., University of Virginia
M.A., University of Chicago
Ph.D., University of Chicago

Marlon Ross

Marlon-Ross

434-924-3354
mr9zf@virginia.edu

Department of English
304C Bryan Hall
PO Box 400121
Charlottesville, VA 22904-4121

B.A., Southwestern University
M.A., University of Chicago
Ph.D., University of Chicago

 
Professor Ross specilizes in African American, Gender and Sexuality Studies, Romanticism.

Selected Publication
Manning the Race, New York University Press, 2004
The Contours of Masculine Desire, Oxford University Press, 1989
 

Lisa Woolfork

Lisa Woolfork

434-243-8932
lw5y@virginia.edu

Department of English
102B Bryan Hall
PO Box 400121
Charlottesville, VA 22904-4121

B.A., Simmons
M.A., Wisconsin-Madison
Ph.D., Wisconsin-Madison

Selected Publications
Embodying American Slavery in Contemporary Culture, University of Illinois Press, 2008

“Academic Mothers and their Feminist Daughters: A Remix” African American Review 40(2006): 35-38.
“Working Moms in Their Own Words” Black Issues in Higher Education, March 28, 2002.

Corinne Field

Corinne Field

434-243-4374
cf6d@virginia.edu

Women, Gender & Sexuality

203 Levering Hall

PO Box 400172

Charlottesville, VA 22904-4172

Fall 2017 Office Hours: Thursday 11:00AM-1:00PM and by appointment

A.B., Stanford University

M.A., Columbia University

Ph.D., Columbia University

 

Corinne Field specilizes in U.S. gender and race, childhood and adulthood.

Corinne Field is Assistant Professor of Women, Gender & Sexuality at the University of Virginia.  She is the author of The Struggle for Equal Adulthood: Gender, Race, Age, and the Fight for Citizenship in Antebellum America (University of North Carolina Press, 2014) and co-editor with Nicholas Syrett of Age in America: Colonial Era to the Present (New York University Press, 2015).  Field is the co-founder of the History of Black Girlhood Network, an informal collaboration of scholars working to promote research into the historical experience of black girls, and she is a co-organizer of the Global History of Black Girlhood Conference to be held at the University of Virginia, March 17-18, 2017.

Her current research investigates the history of generational conflict within Anglo-American feminism from the 1870s to the 1930s, focusing in particular on the deep connections between age prejudice and racial prejudice in arguments for women's empowerment.  Field received her Ph.D. in American history from Columbia University and her B.A. from Stanford University.  She has been a fellow at the Virginia Foundation for the Humanities, the Institute for Advanced Studies in Culture at the University of Virginia, the Huntington Library, and the Schlesinger Library.

 

 

Selected Publications:

  • Co-editing with Nicholas Syrett, Chronological Age in American History, a collection of essays that will explore how age mattered in the development of citizenship, work, education, and culture.  Under Contract at New York University Press.
     
  • “‘Made Women of When They are Mere Children’: Mary Wollstonecraft’s Critique of Eighteenth-Century Girlhood,” Journal of the History of Childhood and Youth (Spring 2011): 197-222.

 

  • “‘Are Women . . . All Minors?’: Woman’s Rights and the Politics of Aging in the Antebellum United States,” Journal of Women’s History (Winter 2001): 113-137.

 

  • “Elizabeth Cady Stanton and the Gendered Politics of Aging,” Iris: A Journal About Women (Spring 2001): 28-31.

 

Personal webpage:  http://corinnefield.com/

André Cavalcante

Cavalcante

434-243-3566
amc7jc@virginia.edu

Department of Media Studies

225 Wilson Hall

PO Box 400866

Charlottesville, VA 22904-4866

 

Women, Gender & Sexuality

201 Levering Hall

P.O. Box 400177

Charlottesville, VA 22904

Office Hours Fall 2017: Thursdays 4-6PM Wilson 225, by appointment

B.S., New York Univesrity

M.A., New York University

Ph.D., University of Michigan

Andre Cavalcante is an assistant professor with a dual appointment in the departments of Media Studies and Women, Gender, and Sexuality. Dr. Cavalcante's research explores lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer (LGBTQ) issues in media.  He also specializes in audience research and the qualitative study of media and everyday life.

His first book Struggling for Ordinary: Media and Transgender Belonging in Everyday Life (NYU Press) explores how media and technology influence the everyday life experiences of transgender individuals and communities. Informed by in-depth interviews and three years of ethnographic work, it examines the toll that media take on this population along with their resilience in the face of disempowerment. The book uses everyday circumstances to show how media and technology operate as a medium through which transgender individuals are able to cultivate an understanding of their identities, build inhabitable worlds, and achieve the routine affordances of everyday life from which they are often excluded. 

His current book project Life in Purple: Young, Queer, and Connected in the American South extends his research program focusing on the ways media influences the everyday possibilities of LGBTQ individuals and communities. It investigates how emerging media and technology rearticulate the meaning of LGBTQ belonging, community, and politics for young LGBTQ people living in the “purple” states of Virginia and North Carolina, which are on the vanguard of the culture wars and offer a mixed bag of possibilities for LGBTQ college-aged people. 

Dr. Cavalcante’s work has appeared in the journals Television & New MediaCritical Studies in Media Communication, Feminist Media Studies, Communication, Culture and Critique, and in the anthologies Watching While Black: Centering the Television of Black Audiences and Reality Television: Oddities of Culture. He received his PhD from the University of Michigan and his MA and BS from New York University.

Struggling for Ordinary: Media and Transgender Belonging in Everyday Life available at https://nyupress.org/books/9781479841318/.

Gertrude Fraser

Gertrude

434-924-3928
gjf2v@virginia.edu

Vice Provost for Faculty Recruitment & Retention
103 Booker House
PO Box 400308
Charlottesville, VA 22904-4308

Ph.D., John Hopkins University

 
In my study of African American traditional midwifery, I worked in the historical archives to explore early southern medical narratives of obstetric progress and eugenic surveillance using these official texts as a counterpoint to older African American women's domestic dialogues about birthing and the body. My collaboration with colleagues in the school of medicine focuses on the social and cultural dimensions of the Human Genome Project. Here I am particularly committed to unraveling the threads of the public response to new genetic technologies and therapeutics. I do this first by considering the specific publics for whom genetic science has meaning, and then move to some broader understanding of "the public." A relatively new research agenda focuses on rural mental health among African American and poor White communities in the south. The goal is to get at the ethnographically complex set of paradigms that undergird these groups' explanatory models of mental illness and treatment. With this project, I see a more direct involvement in the potential policy issues that will influence mental health delivery programs to rural southern communities. Altogether the engine that drives my anthropology is an interdisciplinary one. I want the work to dictate the avenues of inquiry and in that vein I encourage my students to look for the theoretical and methodological connections where they find them. The important thing is to pay attention.

Geographically, I am an Americanist with a strong emphasis on African American communities in the south. More broadly speaking, by training and personal inclination, my goal is to conduct long-term comparative research in African American communities across the New World diaspora. I am just at the exploratory stage, therefore, of a new field project in the English speaking Caribbean.

Selected Publications:
1998 - African American Midwifery in the South: Dialogues of Birth, Race, and Memory. Cambridge: Harvard University Press.
1995 - Modern Minds, Modern Bodies: Reproductive Change in an African-American Community. In Conceiving the New World Order, the Global Politics of Reproduction. Rayna Rapp and Faye Ginsburg, eds. Berkeley: University of California Press.

Michiko Wilson

Michiko Wilson

434-924-4642
mnw5m@virginia.edu

Department of East Asian Languages, Literatures & Cultures
159 New Cabell Hall
PO Box 400781
Charlottesville, VA 22904-4781
 

Ph.D., University of Texas at Austin

 
Michiko N. Wilson has worked extensively both in the field of literary criticism and as a translator of modern Japanese literature. Her particular interest is the intersection of literature as an activator of the imagination with the relevance of literature to larger humanistic concerns. Her first encounter with the West as an American Field Service scholarship high school student in the United States awakened her to the richness of cross-cultural discourse. She subsequently returned to the U.S. as an undergraduate English major to advance her love of literature and completed her masters in Japanese literature and doctorate in comparative literature.

Ms. Wilson’s appreciation of literary inquiry was further enriched by an examination of marginality and outsiderhood as developed in cultural anthropology. These notions converged with her research on comparative cultural perspectives, semiotics, and gender and other feminist issues in modern Japanese literature. She is a ranking expert on Nobel Laureate Kenzaburo Oe and on Minako Oba, both of whose work she has been instrumental in introducing to an English-speaking audience. More recently, she has been concentrating on critical essays written by modern and contemporary Japanese women writers whose iconoclastic and re-visionary voices as cultural critics speak to a broad audience. Ms. Wilson is also the editor of New Japanese Horizons (a Japanese literature-in-translation series).

In all of her roles, she takes pleasure in introducing the writings of a wide range of Japanese writers to students, classroom teachers, non-Japanese literature specialists, and the general public.

Selected Publications
Modern Japanese Women Writers as Artists as Cultural Critics: Miyamoto, Ôba, Saegusa. Portland, ME: MerwinAsia. October, 2012
Birds Crying by Minako Ôba (a 1985 novel). Ithaca, NY: Cornell East Asia Series, New Japanese Horizons. December, 2011
Gender Is Fair Game: (Re)Thinking the (Fe)Male in Minako Ôba’s Works. Armonk, New York: M. E. Sharpe. January, 1999

Cynthia Hoehler-Fatton

Hoehler-Fatton

434-243-9671
chh3a@virginia.edu

Department of Religious Studies
PO Box 400126
Charlottesville, VA 22904-4126

B.A., Bowdoin College
M.A., University of Virginia
Ph.D., University of Virginia

 
My teaching and scholarship concentrate on the intersections between African indigenous religions and Christianity and Islam over the last hundred years. I am fascinated by religious change, and my research—whether it be on gender in East African independent churches, the revitalization of "ATR"  (African Traditional Religion) in post-apartheid South Africa, or my current work on the introduction of Islam into Western Kenya—reflects my ongoing interest in the dynamism of religion. For several years, I served as Associate Director of the Carter G. Woodson Institute, where I directed the undergraduate interdisciplinary program in African-American and African Studies.

Nicholas J. G. Winter

Nick Winter

434-924-6994
nwinter@virginia.edu

Department of Politics

S385 Gibson Hall

1540 Jefferson Park Avenue

PO Box 400787

Charlottesville, VA 22904-4787

Ph.D., University of Michigan

Nicholas Winter is Associate Professor in the Politics Department and co-director of the PVI Collaborative. His research examines the role of race, gender, and sexuality in public opinion and American politics, with a focus on the interplay between the social-level work done by race, gender, and sexuality to organization of systems of power and inequality, and the individual-level psychological work they do to organize people’s opinions and actions in the realm of politics. He cofounded and directs the Political Psychology Working Group, which supports interdisciplinary research and teaching at the intersections of politics and psychology, and runs the Political Cognition Laboratory, a web platform used by faculty, graduate students, and undergraduates to conduct political-psychological research. He regularly teaches courses on gender, sexuality, and politics and on the political psychology of power and inequality.

Lawrie Balfour

Balfour

434-924-4631
klb3q@virginia.edu

Department of Politics
S395 Gibson Hall
1540 Jefferson Park Ave
PO Box 400787
Charlottesville, VA 22904-4787

Ph.D., Princeton

 
Lawrie Balfour is the author of Democracy’s Reconstruction: Thinking Politically with W. E. B. Du Bois (Oxford University Press) and The Evidence of Things Not Said: James Baldwin and the Promise of American Democracy (Cornell University Press). Her articles on race and democratic theory have appeared in Political Theory, American Political Science Review, Hypatia, The Du Bois Review, The Review of Politics, and edited collections. She is now working on a book project on reparations for slavery and Jim Crow. Balfour has held fellowships from the W.E.B. Du Bois Institute for Afro-American Research, the Center for the Study of Values in Public Life at Harvard Divinity School, the Virginia Foundation for the Humanities, and the National Endowment for the Humanities. A recipient of multiple teaching awards, she was Laurence S. Rockefeller Visiting Associate Professor for Distinguished Teaching at Princeton University in 2008-2009 and a visiting faculty member at the École des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales in Paris in May 2012. She was a member of the Journal of Politics editorial board from 2005-07 and 2009-11 and currently serves on the board of Politics, Groups, and Identities. Balfour is Director of Fellowships at the Carter G. Woodson Institute for African American and African Studies at UVA.

Lynn M. Sanders

Lynn Sanders

434-924-3613
lsanders@virginia.edu

Department of Politics
S265 Gibson Hall
1540 Jefferson Park Avenue
PO Box 400787
Charlottesville, VA 22902-4787

Ph.D., University of Michigan

 
Professor Sanders fields of study is American Government (Public Opinion, Racial and Gender Politics, Democratic Theory). Her current research, supported by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, focuses on the influence of political participation on mental health. A book manuscript in progress examines how the methodological assumptions of survey researchers have shaped Americans' understandings of public opinion on race. Contributor to journals including Philosophy of the Social Sciences, Political Theory, American Journal of Sociology, and to Divided by Color (with Donald Kinder, 1996).

Fred Maus

Fred Maus

434-924-6497
fem2x@virginia.edu

McIntire Department of Music
202 Old Cabell Hall
PO Box 400176
Charlottesville, VA 22904-4176

M.Litt., Oxford University
Ph.D., Princeton University

Research Interests: Theory and analysis, gender and sexuality, popular music, aesthetics, dramatic and narrative aspects of instrumental music

 

Selected Publications
"Narrative, Drama, and Emotion in Instrumental Music," in Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 55/3 (1997)
"Concepts of Musical Unity," in Cook and Everist, Rethinking Music (1999); "Musical Performance as Analytical Communication," in Gaskell and Kemal, Performance and Authenticity in the Arts (1999)
"Criticism: General Introduction" and "Narratology, narrativity," in New Grove Dictionary of Music and Musicians; "Learning from 'Occasional' Writing," in repercussions 6/2 (2001)
"Glamour and Evasion: The Fabulous Ambivalence of the Pet Shop Boys," in Popular Music 20/3 (2001)
Forthcoming: "Sexual and Musical Categories"

Hanadi Al-Samman

Al-Samman

434-243-4355
ha2b@virginia.edu

Department of Middle Eastern and South Asian Languages & Cultures

New Cabell Hall

PO Box 400781

Charlottesville, VA 22904-4781

Ph.D. Indiana University

Selected Publications

Anxiety of Erasure: Trauma, Authorship, and the Diaspora in Arab Women’s Writings. Syracuse: Syracuse University Press, 2015.

Co-editor with (Tarek El-Ariss), "Queer Affects," special issue of International Journal of Middle East Studies 45:2 May 2013.

Andrea L. Press

Andrea Press

434-243-8861
apress@virginia.edu

Department of Media Studies
221 Wilson Hall
PO Box 400866
Charlottesville, VA 22904-4866

B.A., Bryn Mawr College
M.A., University of California, Berkeley
Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley

 
Andrea Press is Professor of Media Studies and Professor of Sociology at the University of Virginia, and was the Executive Director of the Virginia Film Festival. She came to the University of Virginia in 2006 to shepherd the Media Studies Program to departmental status and to begin its graduate program. Her last appointment was at the University of Illinois at Urbana/Champaign, where she directed the Media Studies Program for nine years, was one of the producers of the Roger Ebert Festival of Overlooked Films, received the Arnold O. Beckman award for excellence in research, and was the recipient of a faculty fellowship at the Center for Advanced Study in the year before she left. Her M.A. and PhD are in Sociology from the University of California at Berkeley and her B.A. is in sociology and anthropology from Bryn Mawr College. She has a wide range of interdisciplinary interests spanning the social sciences and the humanities which comprise Media Studies. Prior to coming to the University of Virginia, Professor Press has held faculty positions at the University of California at Davis, the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor, the University of Illinois at Urbana/Champaign, and the London School of Economics in departments as diverse as communications, sociology, writing studies, social psychology, and women’s studies. She held an NIMH Postdoctoral Fellowship in the Medical College of the University of Kentucky, was scholar-in-residence at the Stanhope Center for Communications Policy Research, was a Visiting Professor at the London School of Economics, and is the recipient of several grants and fellowships from the National Science Foundation, the Danforth Foundation, and Soroptimist International.

Professor Press is internationally known for her interdisciplinary scholarship on the media audience, on feminist media issues, and on media and social class in the U.S. She is the author of Women Watching Television: Gender, Class And Generation In The American Television Experience (University of Pennsylvania Press), the co-author (with Elizabeth Cole) of Speaking Of Abortion: Television And Authority In The Lives Of Women (University of Chicago Press), and the co-author (with Bruce A. Williams) of The New Media Environment (Blackwell). For the past fifteen years she has co-edited the journal The Communication Review with Bruce A. Williams. She has also edited book series in feminist media studies for the University of Pennsylvania Press and the University of Illinois Press. Professor Press is known for pioneering the use of qualitative research methods to study the cultural impact of the media in the U.S., and for innovative work on media “impact,” specifically vis-à-vis women and members of different social classes. Professor Press has published numerous essays, articles, and chapters on feminist media theory, social class and the media, and media audiences. Her forthcoming book, Feminism LOL: Media Culture and “Feminism on the Ground” in a Postfeminist Age, is based on interviews with men and women of different ages and social class backgrounds about feminist issues and their representation in the media.

Selected Publications
The New Media Environment, Wiley-Blackwell, Aug 2010
Speaking Of Abortion, University of Chicago Press, Apr 1999
Women Watching Television, University of Pennsylvania Press, Mar 1991

Elizabeth F. Thompson

Thompson

434-924-6423
eft3k@virginia.edu

Corcoran Department of History
253 Nau Hall
Charlottesville, VA 22904

B.A., Harvard
M.I.A., Columbia
Ph.D., Columbia

 
20th-century Middle Eastern history: Social Movements, Colonialism, Gender, Public Sphere and Cinema

Selected Publications
Justice Interrupted:  The Struggle for Constitutional Government in the Middle East (Cambridge, Mass, Harvard University Press, 2013)

Colonial Citizens: Republican Rights, Paternal Privilege, and Gender in French Syria and Lebanon, New York, Columbia University Press, 2000.

Lorna Martens

434-924-6704
lm2e@virginia.edu

Department of Germanic Languages & Literatures
114 Halsey Annex A
PO Box 400125
Charlottesville, VA 22904-4125

B.A., Reed College
M.Phil., Yale University
Ph.D., Yale University

 
Comparative literature 18th-20th centuries, modern German and Austrian literature, women's studies, GDR literature, poetry, narrative and narrative theory

Selected Publications
The Promise of Memory: Childhood Recollection and its Objects in Literary Modernism (Cambridge, MA:  Harvard University Press, 2011).

The Promised Land? Feminist Writing in the German Democratic Republic (Albany: State University of New York Press, 2001), 273 pp.
 

Deborah E. McDowell

Deborah McDowell

434-924-8892
dem8z@virginia.edu

Carter G. Woodson Institute
101 Minor Hall
PO Box 400162
Charlottesville, VA 22904-4162

B.A., Tuskegee Institute
M.A., Purdue University
Ph.D., Purdue University

Selected Publications
Pauline Hopkins. Of One Blood, Or the Hidden Self, edited, And with an Introduction. Simon and Schuster, 2004.
Frederick Douglass.  Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, edited and with an introduction. Oxford University Press, 1999.           
Leaving Pipe Shop:  Memories of Kin. Scribner’s, 1997 Paperback edition, W. W. Norton, 1998.
Period Editor, "Realism, Naturalism, Modernism, 1940-1960."
Norton Anthology of African-African-American Literature, Henry Louis Gates and Nellie McKay, General Editors, 1996.
"The Changing Same":  Studies in Fiction by Black-American Women Book length study. Indiana University Press 1995.
Slavery and the Literary Imagination, edited with Arnold Rampersad.  Papers of the English Institute. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins, 1988.
Zora Neale Hurston.  Moses, Man of the Mountain. Edited and with an Introduction. New York: Harper & Row, 1990.

Anne Behnke Kinney

Kimney

434-243-4929
aeb2n@virginia.edu

Department of East Asian Languages Literatures & Cultures
165 New Cabell Hall
PO Box 400781
Charlottesville, VA 22904-4781

B.A., Oakland University
M.A., University of Michigan System, Ann Arbor
Ph.D., University of Michigan System, Ann Arbor

 
Early Chinese literature, thought and social history; history of childhood in China; history of women in premodern China.

Caroline Rody

Caroline Rody

434-924-6628
cmrody@virginia.edu

Department of English
432 Bryan Hall
PO Box 400121
Charlottesville, VA 22904-4121

B.A., Harvard, Radcliffe
M.A., University of Virginia
Ph.D., University of Virginia

Selected Publications
The Interethnic Imagination: Roots and Passages in Contemporary Asian American Fiction, Oxford University Press, 2009
The Daughter’s Return: African-American and Caribbean Women's Fictions of History, Oxford University Press, 2001

Doug Meyer

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434-924-7785
dom6e@virginia.edu

Women, Gender & Sexuality
204 Levering Hall
PO Box 400172
Charlottesville, VA 22904-4172

Fall 2017 Office Hours: Tuesday/Thursday 4:45-6pm, Wednesday 3-5pm, and by appointment

Education

B.A., Albion College

M.A., CUNY

Ph.D., CUNY Graduate Center

Selected Publications:

Meyer, Doug.  2015.  Violence against Queer People: Race, Class, Gender, and the Persistence of Anti-LGBT Discrimination.  New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press.

Meyer, Doug.  Forthcoming.  “The Disregarding of Heteronormativity: Emphasizing a Happy Queer Adulthood and Localizing Anti-Queer Violence to Adolescent Schools.”  Sexuality Research and Social Policy (published online, ahead of print)

Meyer, Doug.  2017.  “‘One Day I’m Going to be Really Successful’: The Social Class Politics of Videos Made for the ‘It Gets Better’ Anti-Gay Bullying Project.”  Critical Sociology 43(1): 113-127.

Meyer, Doug.  2016.  “The Gentle Neoliberalism of Modern Anti-Bullying Texts: Surveillance, Intervention, and Bystanders in Contemporary Bullying Discourse.”  Sexuality Research and Social Policy 13(4): 356-370.

Meyer, Doug.  2014.  “Resisting Hate Crime Discourse: Queer and Intersectional Challenges to Neoliberal Hate Crime Laws.”  Critical Criminology 22(1): 113-125.

Meyer, Doug and Eric Anthony Grollman.  2014.  “Sexual Orientation and Fear at Night: Gender Differences among Sexual Minorities and Heterosexuals.”  Journal of Homosexuality 61(4): 453-470.

Meyer, Doug.  2012.  “An Intersectional Analysis of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender (LGBT) People’s Evaluations of Anti-Queer Violence.”  Gender & Society 26(6): 849-873.

Emily Ogden

Emily Ogden

434-243-3395
emily.ogden@virginia.edu

212 Bryan Hall

A.B., Harvard University
Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania
 

Specializing in 19th C American lit, American literature

Selected Publications:

  • "Edgar Huntly and the Regulation of the Senses." American Literature 85.3 (September 2013): 419-445.
  • "Pointing the Finger." J19 1.1 (Spring 2013): 166-72.
  • "Mesmer's Demon: Fiction, Falsehood, and the Mechanical Imagination." Early American Literature 47.1 (2012): 143-70.

Gustavo Pellón

Gustavo

434-924-4655
pellon@virginia.edu

New Cabell Hall 463

B.A., Brown University
PhD, State University of New York at Binghamton

 

 

Books

  • The U.S.-Mexican War: A Binational Reader (Hackett Publishing Company, 2010)
  • Mempo Giardinelli, An Impossible Balance, (Juan de la Cuesta, 2010)

 

Lisa Goff

Lisa Goff

924-6642
lg6t@virginia.edu

102 Bryan Hall

PO Box 400121

Office Hours F16: Fridays 1-4pm

Bachelor of Arts (BA), College of William and Mary

Master of Science (MS), Northwestern University

Master of Arts (MA), University of Virginia

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD), University of Virginia

Specialties in women and media in the Global South, literary journalism, gender and social media, cultural landscapes, public history, theories and methods of American Studies. Lisa Goff also recently launched a new digital history project, Take Back the Archive, dedicated to the history of sexual violence at UVA.

 

Recent Publications:

Shantytown USA: Forgotten Landscapes of the Working Poor, Harvard University Press, 2016

Allison Pugh

Pugh

(434) 924-6510
apugh@virginia.edu

http://wgs.virginia.edu/sites/wgs.virginia.edu/files/Pugh_CV_8.28.14.pdf

University of Virginia Sociology Department
Randall Hall Room 210
P.O. Box 400766
Charlottesville, VA 22904

MW 12:45-1:45pm,
sign up for appointment online for priority

Allison Pugh is Associate Professor of Sociology. Her research and teaching focus on how people adapt in their intimate lives to broad socio-economic trends such as increasing insecurity, commercialization, overwork, and risk.

Prof. Pugh’s study on job precariousness, entitled The Tumbleweed Society: Working and Caring in an Age of Insecurity, is due out in January (Oxford).   An analysis of “insecurity culture,” Tumbleweed evaluates whether and how job insecurity bleeds into people’s intimate lives, and asks the question:  if employers owe us very little, what does that mean for the way we think about obligation in our other relationships?  How might these broader impacts of job insecurity vary by gender and class?  Prof. Pugh is also finishing up an edited volume on the broader effects of job insecurity, entitled Beyond the Cubicle: Insecurity Culture and the Flexible Self (Oxford University Press). With graduate student Sarah Mosseri, Prof. Pugh is researching how people frame arguments against overwork in mainstream newspapers and social media. She also writes about qualitative methods, and how empathy and knowledge are related.

Prof. Pugh’s first book, Longing and Belonging: Parents, Children, and Consumer Culture (University of California Press, 2009), was awarded the 2010 William J. Goode award for the best book in the Sociology of the Family and the Distinguished Contribution award from the ASA’s section on the Sociology of Children and Youth; it was also a finalist for the 2010 C. Wright Mills award.

In 2013, Prof. Pugh was the Marie Jahoda Visiting Professor for International Gender Studies at the Ruhr University in Bochum, and she is an honorary research fellow at the United States Study Centre at the University of Sydney, Australia. Her research has been funded by the National Science Foundation, the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, and the Bankard Fund for Political Economy. Prof. Pugh teaches family, culture, gender, work, childhood and qualitative methods.

Prof. Pugh is also the culture editor for the journal Contexts, which seeks to bring sociological knowledge to broader audiences.  She gives talks to both academic and lay audiences on consumption and children, job insecurity, and contemporary family life, and maintains a twitter feed @allison_pugh.

Books


Longing and Belonging: Parents, Children and Consumer Culture
University of California Press, March 2009.

 
The Tumbleweed Society: Working and Caring in an Insecure Age
Oxford University Press: February 2015.

Articles
Pugh, Allison J.  2014.  “The Divining Rod of Talk: Emotions, Contradictions and the Limits of Research.”  (Reply to comment by Stephen Vaisey).  American Journal of Cultural Sociology. Vol. 2, Issue 1 (February): 159-163.

Pugh, Allison J.  2014.  “The Theoretical Costs of Ignoring Childhood: Rethinking Independence, Insecurity and Inequality.” Theory and Society.  January 2014, Volume 43, Issue 1, pp 71-89.

Pugh, Allison J. 2013. “What Good Are Interviews for Thinking About Culture? Demystifying Interpretive Analysis.” American Journal of Cultural Sociology. Vol 1 (February): 42-68.
Pugh, Allison J. 2011. "Distinction, Boundaries or Bridges?: Children, Inequality and the Uses of Consumer Culture."  Poetics, Volume 39 (1):1-18.  February.
“Selling Compromise:  Toys, Motherhood and the Cultural Deal.”  Gender & Society 19:729-749.  (December 2005)
“Windfall Childrearing:  Low-Income Care and Consumption.”   Journal of Consumer Culture  4 (2):  229-249  (July 2004).

W. Bradford Wilcox

Wilcox

434-321-8601
wbw7q@virginia.edu

http://wgs.virginia.edu/sites/wgs.virginia.edu/files/vitawilcoxacademiclatest.doc

University of Virginia
P.O. Box 400766
Randall 110
Charlottesville, VA 22904

  • Ph.D., Sociology, Princeton University, 2001. Dissertation Advisors: Robert Wuthnow (chair), Sara McLanahan, and Paul DiMaggio.
  • M.A., Sociology, Princeton University, 1997. Fields of Study: family, religion, culture. “With Distinction.”
  • B.A., Government, University of Virginia, 1992. “With High Honors.”

 

As an undergraduate, Wilcox was a Jefferson Scholar at the University of Virginia (’92) and later earned his Ph.D. from Princeton University. Prior to coming to the University of Virginia, he held research fellowships at Princeton University, Yale University, and the Brookings Institution.
The coauthor of Gender and Parenthood: Biological and Social Scientific Perspectives (Columbia, 2013, with Kathleen Kovner Kline), Professor Wilcox’s research has focused on marriage, fatherhood, and cohabitation, especially on the ways that family structure, civil society, and culture influence the quality and stability of family life in the United States and around the globe. Now, Dr. Wilcox is exploring the contribution that families make to the economic welfare of individuals and societies. He is also the coauthor of Whither the Child?: Causes and Consequences of Low Fertility (Paradigm, 2013, with Eric Kaufmann) and the author of Soft Patriarchs, New Men: How Christianity Shapes Fathers and Husbands (Chicago, 2004). Wilcox has published articles on marriage, cohabitation, parenting, and fatherhood in The American Sociological Review, Social Forces, The Journal of Marriage and Family and The Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion. Wilcox is now writing a book with Nicholas Wolfinger titled, Soul Mates: Religion, Sex, Children, & Marriage among African Americans and Latinos (Oxford 2015).
Brad Wilcox has received the following two awards from the American Sociological Association Religion Section for his research: the Best Graduate Paper Award and the Best Article Award. His research has also been featured in The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, BBC News, The Atlantic, The Washington Post, USA Today, The Boston Globe, CNN, The Los Angeles TimesCBS NewsNBC's The Today Show, and on NPR. He also writes regularly for publications like The Wall Street Journal.

  • 2015. Soul Mates: Religion, Sex, Love, and Marriage among African Americans and Latinos. New York: Oxford University Press. (With Nicholas Wolfinger, October 2015).
  • 2013. Gender and Parenthood: Biological and Social Scientific Perspectives. New York, NY: Columbia University Press. (With Kathleen Kovner Kline). Edited volume.
  • 2013. Whither the Child? The Causes and Consequences of Low Fertility in the Developed World. Boulder, CO: Paradigm. (With Eric Kaufman). Edited volume.
  • 2004. Soft Patriarchs, New Men: How Christianity Shapes Fathers and Husbands. Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press.

Claire Kaplan

Claire Kaplan

434-982-2774
cnk2r@virginia.edu

1400 University Avenue

Charlottesville, VA 22903

B.S. from University of California- Davis
Masters from the University of Southern California

Ph.D. from the University of Virginia

Claire Kaplan, Ph.D., is Director of the Gender Violence and Social Change Program at UVA’s Maxine Platzer Lynn Women’s Center. She manages a national listserv for campus-based anti-violence programs, and has served on numerous committees and boards, including the campus advisory committee for Futures Without Violence; Leadership Council of Campus Advocacy and Prevention Professionals, the Board of Take Back the Night Foundation; and the Campus Task Force of Virginia Sexual and Domestic Violence Action Alliance. 

 

Publications: 

“Domestic Violence–Intimate Partner Violence,” (Emergency Medicine Specialty Reports, 2006); 

“Shattered Pride: Resistance and Intervention Strategies in Cases of Sexual Assault, Relationship Violence, and Hate Crimes Against Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual and Transgender Students”, in Toward Acceptance: Sexual Orientation on Campus, edited by Nancy Evans and Vernon Wall (University Press of America: 2000); 

"Violence Against Women: Responses by Women's Centers to Sexual Violence” for The Handbook for University and College Women's Centers, Greenwood Publishing Group (2002).  

Jaronda Miller-Bryant

Miller-Bryant

434-924-9732
jjm8ac@virginia.edu

1400 University Avenue
 Charlottesville, VA 22903

B.A. from Spelman College
M.S. from the University of North Carolina at Greensboro
Ph.D. from Northeastern University

Program Director for Women, Girls and Global Justice, the Young Women Leaders Program, and Engaged Scholarship. Jaronda graduated from Spelman College with a B.A. in Psychology/Military Science. She later earned her M.S. from the University of North Carolina at Greensboro in Counselor Education with a Concentration in School Counseling and Dropout Prevention. She also holds a Ph.D. from Northeastern University in Sociology with Concentrations in Race and Ethnic Relations and Educational Stratification.

Sybil Scholz

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434-924-6694
ses5yj@virginia.edu

http://wgs.virginia.edu/sites/wgs.virginia.edu/files/Sybil%20Scholz%20-%20WGS%20profile_0.doc

Department of Germanic Languages and Literatures
University of Virginia
New Cabell Hall 243
Charlottesville, VA 22904-4125

Mondays and Wednesdays from 1:00-2:00 and by appointment

M.A., English Linguistics and Literature, German Linguistics and Literature, and Japanese Language and Cultural Studies from Universität zu Köln
Certificate in Teaching German as a Foreign Language (DaF) from Universität Kassel
Degrée from Sorbonne University, Paris
Ph.D. from Universität zu Köln, Germany

Interests in languages and language teaching; linguistics (phonology, morphology, syntax, first and second language acquisition, second language teaching, language pedagogy and gender/queer studies); women writers of the 19th and 20th centuries; feminist theory.

Books
Scholz, Sybil (ed.). 2002. Context and Cognition: Papers in Honour of Wolf-Dietrich Bald's 60th Birthday. München: Langenscheidt-Longman.

Articles
Scholz, Sybil & Angela Kesseler. 2002. "Naked Facts – Advertising Gender." In: Scholz, Sybil (ed.). Context and Cognition. München: Langenscheidt-Longman. 181-99.

Samantha J. Hume

Hume


sjh2g@virginia.edu

http://wgs.virginia.edu/sites/wgs.virginia.edu/files/Sam%20Hume%20CV.doc

New Cabell Hall, 2nd Floor
P.O. Box 400125
Charlottesville, VA 22904-4125

Intensive Russian Interpreters’ Preparation from Humboldt Universität Berlin, Germany
Certificate of Teaching English as a Foreign Language to Adults (CTEFLA) from British Council Berlin Berlin, Germany
B.A. from University of Kent Canterbury, England
Diploma in Translation German/English from Institute of Linguists London, England
M.A. from University of Nottingham- Nottingham, England
Ph.D from University of Exeter  Exeter, England

Her research interests are on Teaching Pedagogy focusing on inclusiveness in language and culture in TESOL/EFL LTE; equity and diversity issues and social justice in education; curriculum design for more audible and visible inclusion of cultural diversity and the use of the SIOPs model to make content instruction more accessible to ELLs.

Publications:
“Here’s tae Us, Wha’s Like us: Val McDermid’s Lindsay Gordon Mysteries”. In Sleuthing Ethnicity. Fischer-Hornung, D &Mueller, M.(Eds). 2003. Cranbury, NJ: Farleigh Dickinson University Press. 227-239.
“The narrative of male violence on women's bodies”. In Gender Forum Issue 6 (2003).
"Unless we realise, Unless we change, Unless we speak.....A look at Carol Shields novel Unless". In Gender Forum Issue 8 (2004).
 
 

Shilpa Davé

Shilpa Dave

434-924-8873
ssd5q@virginia.edu

http://wgs.virginia.edu/sites/wgs.virginia.edu/files/Dav%C3%A9%20CV%20JUNE%202014-site.doc

268 Monroe Hall
University of Virginia
Charlottesville, VA

B.S.  English (with departmental and college honors) and Molecular Biology (with college honors) from University of Wisconsin—Madison, May 1988.

M.A.  English Languages and Literature from The University of Michigan, December 1991.

Ph.D.  English Languages and Literature from The University of Michigan,  May 1997.

 

Shilpa Davé is an Assistant Professor of Media Studies and American Studies at the University of Virginia and an Assistant Dean in the College of Arts and Science working with Bonnycastle, Hancock, and Lile-Maupin Associations.

Shilpa Davé is the author of Indian Accents: Brown Voice and Racial Performance in American Television and Film (University of Illinois Press Feb 2013) and is the co-editor of the collection East Main Street: Asian American Popular Culture (NYU Press 2005). She earned her Bachelors degree at the University of Wisconsin at Madison and her  M.A. and Ph.D. from the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor. She came to the University of Virginia from the department of American Studies at Brandeis University and she has held faculty positions at Cornell University, Wesleyan University, and UW-Madison and been a director and assistant dean of the Multicultural Resource Center at Oberlin College.  

Professor Davé researches and teaches about representations of race and gender in media and popular culture, American cultural narratives of immigration and border crossings, comparative American studies including Asian American and South Asian American Studies, and film, television, and literary studies. She has published on topics ranging from teaching Asian American Studies to “No Life Without Wife: Masculinity and Modern Arranged Meetings for Indian Americans” to “Apu's Brown Voice: Cultural Inflection and South Asian Accents,” the comic series Spider-Man India, and on Model Minorities and the Spelling Bee.

Articles

“Indian Accents” grow stronger on television

Books

Indian Accents

Univ of Illinois Press, Feb 2013

 

Claire Raymond

Claire Raymond

1-434-924-6123 to leave a message
scp2u@virginia.edu

Fayerweather Hall
P.O. Box 400130
Charlottesville, VA 22904

 Monday 12-4pm, Tuesday & Thursday 11am-12:15pm & 2-3:15pm

PhD from the Graduate Center of the City University of New York

Claire Raymond holds a doctorate in English literature (Ph.D., The Graduate School and University Center). Her work as a graduate student received the Carolyn Heilbrun prize for feminist scholarship, the Adrienne Auslander Munich prize and the Helene Neustead Fellowship, all awarded by the Graduate Center of the City University of New York. Raymond's first book, The Posthumous Voice in Women’s Writing from Mary Shelley to Sylvia Plath (Ashgate 2006), explores female elegy and the trope of the dead speaker in women’s writing. Her second book, Francesca Woodman and the Kantian Sublime (Ashgate 2010), theorizes the work of the American photographer Francesca Woodman. She focuses on the place where gender intersects aesthetics, as a telling branch of culture. This summer she completed a manuscript on the figure of the witness in gender violence as represented in American women’s literature and photography, provisionally titled Sadism and Specularity in American Women’s Photography and Literature. A chapbook of her poems, The Gleaners, is forthcoming from Tiger’s Eye Press in 2012. Raymond's teaching interests include queer theory, gender violence, and race theory. She teaches courses such as American Ghost, Queer Theory, Women’s Photography and Violence in the Media, cross-listing with Sociology and Art History.

Books
The Posthumous Voice in Women’s Writing (2006)
Francesca Woodman and the Kantian Sublime (2010)
Witnessing Sadism in Texts of the American South (2014)

Books of Poetry and a Chapbook of Poetry
The Gleaners (2013)
 Museum of Snow (2013)
 Motels Where We Lived
(2014)
After Houses (2014).

Karl Shuve

Karl Shuve

434-924-6712
kes3ba@virginia.edu

Department of Religious Studies
PO Box 400126
Charlottesville, VA 22904-4126

Office: Gibson Hall, S-238

Bachelor of Arts (BA), McMaster University
Master of Arts (MA), McMaster University
Doctor of Philosophy (PhD), University of Edinburgh
 

I am a historian who studies the development of Christian culture and thought, especially in the world of Late Antiquity. My work attends, in particular, to questions of identity and authority: How did Christians understand their place in society—both as individuals and as a collective church—and what tools did they use to construct, legitimate and disseminate their views? I am, therefore, keenly interested in studying the ways that early Christians interacted with their sacred texts and employed them in establishing normative practices and beliefs. Much of my research in recent years has focused on the role played by the Song of Songs in shaping attitudes towards the church and the body. I am presently completing a monograph, The Song of Songs and the Fashioning of Identity in Early Latin Chrsitianity, which employs social anthropological theory to explain the emergence of ascetic readings of the Song in the fourth-century Western Roman Empire. This work on the Song has led me to begin writing a cultural history of the nuptial metaphor (the identification of the church/soul/virgin as the bride of Christ) in Late Antiquity, which focuses especially on theoretical issues pertaining to the representation of women in literature and art.
Every year, I have the privilege of teaching the entire two-thousand year history of Christianity, offering The Rise of Christianity in the Fall semester and The Reform and Global Expansion of Christianity in the Spring. My interests lie broadly in scriptural interpretation, monasticism and asceticism, gender and sexuality, wealth and poverty, and Christology/Trinitarian Theology and I routinely teach upper-year and graduate seminars on these themes. I am also in the process of developing a course on religious interaction in Late Antiquity, both within and beyond the borders of the Roman Empire.
 

Selected Publications:
“The Episcopal Career of Gregory of Elvira” Journal of Ecclesiastical History (to appear April 2014).
“The Patristic Reception of Luke and Acts: Scholarship, Theology and Moral Exhortation in the Homilies of Origen and John Chrysostom”, in Issues in Luke-Acts (ed. S. Adams and M. Pahl; Gorgias Press, 2012), pp. 263-86.
“Irenaeus’ Contribution to Early Christian Interpretation of the Song of Songs”, in Irenaeus and His Traditions (ed. P. Foster and S. Parvis; Minneapolis: Fortress Press, 2012).
“Origen and the Tractatus de Epithalamio of Gregory of Elvira” Studia Patristica 50 (Leuven: Peeters, 2011), pp. 189-203.
“Cyprian of Carthage’s Writings from the Rebaptism Controversy: Two Revisionary Proposals Reconsidered” Journal of Theological Studies 61/2 (2010), pp. 627-43.
“Entering the Story: Origen’s Dramatic Approach to Scripture in the Homilies on Jeremiah” Studia Patristica 46 (Leuven: Peeters, 2010), pp. 235-40.
“The Doctrine of the False Pericopes and Other Late Antique Approaches to the Problem of Scripture’s Unity”, inPlots in the Pseudo-Clementine Romance (ed. F. Amsler et al.; Prahins, Switzerland: Éditions du Zèbre, 2008), pp. 437-45.

Feyza Burak-Adli


fb6k@virginia.edu

105 Levering Hall
PO Box 400172
Charlottesville, VA 22904

Office Hours Fall 2016: Tuesdays 1:00-3:00PM and by appointment

Education
Boston University, Ph.D. program
Brandeis University, M.A. in Anthropology and Women and Gender Studies
Wake Forest University, M.A. in English
Fatih University, B.A. In English Language and Literature

Burak-Adli, Feyza (2012). “The Veiled Periphery: Rural Kurdish Women in Turkey and Taboo of Sexuality.” Student Anthropologist Vol. 3, Number 1.

Abigail Arnold

Abby

434-982-2960
asa8np@virginia.edu

205 Levering Hall
PO Box 400172
Charlottesville, VA 22904

Office Hours Fall 2017: Tuesdays 2-3PM and by appointment

University of North Carolina, Ph.D. in English, Writing and Rhetoric

Bennington College, M.F.A. Fiction

Virginia Commonwealth University, M.A. in English Literature

Virginia Commonwealth University, M.S.W.

University of Virginia, B.A. in English Literature

Lanice Avery

Lanice Avery

434-297-4894
la4gd@virginia.edu

Women, Gender & Sexuality
202 Levering Hall
PO Box 400177
Charlottesville, VA 22904

Psychology Department
B010 Gilmer Hall

Fall 2017 Office Hours: Tuesdays from 2-4pm in Gilmer 306

B.A., San Francisco State University

M.S., University of Michigan

Ph.D., University of Michigan

Lanice Avery is an Assistant Professor of Psychology and Gender, Women & Sexuality. She is an interdisciplinary scholar whose overarching research interest is in the promotion of healthy gender and sexual development among socially marginalized and stigmatized groups. Specifically, her work examines Black women’s intersectional identity and how the negotiation of hegemonic gender ideologies and racial stereotypes are associated with negative psychological and sexual outcomes.

Currently, Dr. Avery has three primary lines of research that focus on understanding the ways in which gender-based psychological and sociocultural factors inform the sexual beliefs, experiences, and health practices of young Black women. Her first line of research explores how Black women negotiate paradoxical expectations to perform hegemonic femininity (e.g., nurturing, submissive, communal) and stoicism (e.g., strong Black woman/superwoman stereotype), and how these negotiations present liabilities to their health and well-being. Her second line of research considers the role of mainstream Black-oriented media in the socialization of erotic injustice – beliefs about sexuality that reflect broader socio-structural injustices experienced by Black women. She considers how romanticizing hypermasculinity and feminine subjugation in intimate partnerships jeopardizes women’s capacity to express sexual agency. Finally, her third line of research examines how the idealization of restrictive feminine beauty and body standards contributes to adverse emotional (e.g., feelings of guilt and shame), cognitive (e.g., body surveillance and dissatisfaction), and behavioral (e.g., high sexual risk taking and low sexual assertiveness) experiences during sexual intimacy.

Selected Publications:

Avery, L. R., Ward, L. M., Moss, L., & Üsküp, D. (2017). Tuning gender: Representations of femininity and masculinity in popular music by Black artists. Journal of Black Psychology, 43, 159-191. doi: 10.1177/0095798415627917

Goldey, K. L., Avery, L. R., & van Anders, S. M. (2014). Sexual fantasies and gender/sex: A multimethod approach with quantitative content analysis and hormonal responses. The Journal of Sex Research, 51, 917-931. doi:10.1080/00224499.2013.798611

Cole, E. R., Avery, L. R., Dodson, C., & Goodman, K. D. (2012). Against nature: How arguments about the naturalness of marriage privilege heterosexuality. Journal of Social Issues, 68, 46-62. doi: 10.1111/j.1540-4560.2012.01735.x

Bridget Murphy

Bridget

434-982-2961
bmm5v@virginia.edu

Levering Hall
PO Box 400177
Charlottesville, VA 22904

Mon-Fri 8:30am - 5:00pm

B.S., Lake Erie College

MHRM, Franklin University

Tom Butcher

Tom

434-882-2960
tmbutcher@virginia.edu

201 Levering Hall

PO Box 400172

Charlottesville, VA 22904

Wednesday: 12:30pm – 2:30pm, By appointment

BA, Washington University in St. Louis, 2010 (Majors: German & Humanities; Minor: History)

MA, University of Virginia, 2013 (History)

PhD, University of Virginia, expected 2018 (History)

Tom is a historian of modern Europe, focusing on the history of ideas about sex, gender, and sexuality. His dissertation, “Sexual Spectra: Biology, Bodies, and Sexual Politics in Europe, 1898–1933,” argues that in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries several important thinkers came to understand biological sex (that is, biological maleness, femaleness, or intersexuality) as a spectrum, rather than as a binary of male and female. These thinkers came from a wide range of scientific and humanistic intellectual circles, including psychologists, sexologists, physicians, research biologists, philosophers, feminists, and gay rights activists. Tom also has research interests in the history of identity more broadly, particularly national identity, as well as the history of philosophy.

Clara Sophia Camber

Clara Sophia


csc4wp@virginia.edu

Augusta Durham

Augusta Durham


ad9fb@virginia.edu

Faculty and Staff

Hanadi Al-Samman

  • Associate Professor of Arabic Literature
ha2b@virginia.edu

Abigail Arnold

  • Lecturer in Women, Gender & Sexuality
asa8np@virginia.edu

Lanice Avery

  • Assistant Professor of Women, Gender & Sexuality and Psychology
la4gd@virginia.edu

Lawrie Balfour

  • Professor of Politics
klb3q@virginia.edu

Rae Blumberg

  • William R. Kenan, Professor of Sociology
rblumberg@virginia.edu

Alison Booth

  • Professor of English
ab6j@virginia.edu

Feyza Burak-Adli

  • Lecturer in Women, Gender & Sexuality and Middle East Studies
fb6k@virginia.edu

Tom Butcher

  • Lecturer of Women, Gender & Sexuality
tmbutcher@virginia.edu

André Cavalcante

  • Assistant Professor of Media Studies and Women, Gender & Sexuality
amc7jc@virginia.edu

Mrinalini Chakravorty

  • Assistant Professor of English, Postcolonial Literature and Theory
mc5je@virginia.edu

Ellen Contini-Morava

  • Director and Professor of the Interdisciplinary Program in Linguistics
elc9j@virginia.edu

Shilpa Davé

  • Assistant Professor of American Studies and Media Studies
ssd5q@virginia.edu

Amanda Davis

  • Lecturer of Women, Gender & Sexuality
ajd7y@virginia.edu

Corinne Field

  • Assistant Professor of Women, Gender & Sexuality
cf6d@virginia.edu

Susan Fraiman

  • Professor of English
sdf8x@virginia.edu

Gertrude Fraser

  • Associate Professor & Vice Provost for Faculty Advancement
gjf2v@virginia.edu

Lisa Goff

  • Assistant Professor of English and American Studies
lg6t@virginia.edu

Bonnie Hagerman

  • Director of Undergraduate Programs and Assistant Professor, General Faculty, of Women, Gender & Sexuality
bmh9m@virginia.edu

Cynthia Hoehler-Fatton

  • Associate Professor of Religious Studies
chh3a@virginia.edu

Samantha J. Hume

  • Doctor of Education at the Deparment of Germanic Languages & Literatures and the Center for American English Language and Culture
sjh2g@virginia.edu

Claire Kaplan

  • Director of The Gender Violence and Social Change Program
cnk2r@virginia.edu

Anne Behnke Kinney

  • Professor of Chinese
aeb2n@virginia.edu

Edith "Winx" Lawrence

  • Professor of Education in Clinical and School Psychology and Director, Young women Leaders Program and Program Chair, Youth and Social Innovation
wlawrence@virginia.edu

Karlin Luedtke

  • Assistant Professor of Women, Gender & Sexuality
  • Assistant Dean in College of A&S
kl5k@virginia.edu

Lorna Martens

  • Professor of German and Comparative Literature
lm2e@virginia.edu

Fred Maus

  • Associate Professor of Music
fem2x@virginia.edu

Deborah E. McDowell

  • Alice Griffin Professor of English and Director of the Carter G. Woodson Institute
dem8z@virginia.edu

Susan McKinnon

  • Professor of Anthropology
sm@virginia.edu

Doug Meyer

  • Assistant Professor of Women, Gender & Sexuality
dom6e@virginia.edu

Farzaneh Milani

  • Professor of Middle Eastern & South Asian Languages & Cultures and Women, Gender & Sexuality
fmm2z@virginia.edu

Jaronda Miller-Bryant

  • Program Director of Global Outreach and Engaged Scholarship and Associate Director of Young Women Leaders Program
jjm8ac@virginia.edu

Bridget Murphy

  • Program Administrator
bmm5v@virginia.edu

K. Sara Myers

  • Professor of Classics
ksm8m@virginia.edu

Emily Ogden

  • Assistant Professor of English
emily.ogden@virginia.edu

Victoria Olwell

  • Associate Professor of English
vjo2f@virginia.edu

Geeta Patel

  • Associate Professor of Middle Eastern & South Asian Languages & Cultures and Women, Gender & Sexuality
ghp5v@virginia.edu

Charlotte J. Patterson

  • Chair of Women, Gender & Sexuality and Professor of Psychology
patterson@virginia.edu

Gustavo Pellón

  • Professor of Spanish
pellon@virginia.edu

Andrea L. Press

  • Professor of Media Studies and Sociology
apress@virginia.edu

Allison Pugh

  • Associate Professor of Sociology
apugh@virginia.edu

Claire Raymond

  • Lecturer a the Department of Art History and Sociology
scp2u@virginia.edu

Caroline Rody

  • Professor of English
cmrody@virginia.edu

Marlon Ross

  • Professor of English
mr9zf@virginia.edu

Lynn M. Sanders

  • Associate Professor of Politics
lsanders@virginia.edu

Sybil Scholz

  • General Faculty, Lecturer and Language Coordinator
ses5yj@virginia.edu

Lisa Shutt

  • Lecturer of African American & African Studies
lt7q@virginia.edu

Karl Shuve

  • Assistant Professor of Religious Studies
kes3ba@virginia.edu

Lisa Speidel

  • Assistant Professor, General Faculty, of Women, Gender & Sexuality
las7p@virginia.edu

Elizabeth F. Thompson

  • Associate Professor of HIstory
eft3k@virginia.edu

Denise Walsh

  • Associate Professor of Politics and Women, Gender & Sexuality
denise@virginia.edu

Gweneth West

  • Professor of Costume Design
glw2r@virginia.edu

Kath Weston

  • Professor of Anthropology
weston@virginia.edu

W. Bradford Wilcox

  • Associate Professor at the Department of Sociology
wbw7q@virginia.edu

Eleanor V. Wilson

  • Associate Professor of Instruction and Special Education
evw2u@virginia.edu

Michiko Wilson

  • Professor of Japanese LIterature
mnw5m@virginia.edu

Nicholas J. G. Winter

  • Associate Professor of Politics
nwinter@virginia.edu

Lisa Woolfork

  • Associate Professor of English
lw5y@virginia.edu