Course Descriptions

WGS 2100 Introduction to Gender and Sexuality Studies

Instructor varies

An introduction to gender and LGBTQ (lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer) studies, including the fields of women’s studies, feminist studies, & masculinity studies. Students will examine historical movements, theoretical issues, & contemporary debates, especially as they pertain to issues of inequality & to the intersection of gender, race, class, sexuality, & nationalism. Emphasis will vary according to the interdisciplinary expertise & research focus of the instructor. 

Special Note: Required for all WGS majors and minors, Intro courses do not count toward concentrations

WGS 2224 Black Femininities and Masculinities in Media

Lisa Shutt

Addresses the role the media has played in creating images and understandings of “Blackness” in the United States, particularly where it converges with popular ideologies about gender.  

Course Category:
Gender Concentration

WGS 2300 Women and Gender in the Deaf World

Sandra Wood

Examines the roles of deaf women inside and outside of the signing Deaf community. Using an interdisciplinary approach, considers such topics as language and cultural barriers, violence against women, sexuality, race, class, education, and work. Investigates disparities between deaf and hearing women and the choices available to d/Deaf women, individually and collectively, in contemporary culture.

Special Note: Combined with ASL 2300

Course Category:
Gender Concentration

WGS 2400 Gender, Death & Dying

This course takes an interdisciplinary approach to exploring ways that gender and sexuality impact death and dying.

Course Category:
Gender Concentration

WGS 2450 Gender and Environmental Justice

Examines different ways of integrating gender into environmental analysis and organizing around the world, with a focus on power and links to race/class/nation.  Topics include women's leadership in environmental movements; ecofeminism vs. feminist environmentalism; gendering of ecological knowledge and restoration; the impact of gendered divisions of labor on ecology; environmental violence; unequal health impacts; intimacy and sustainability.

Course Category:
Global, Gender Concentration

WGS 2500 Topics in Women, Gender & Sexuality

See specific semesters to check for topics being offered.

WGS 2559 (All) New Course in WGS

varies

Provides the opportunity to offer a new topic in the subject area of women, gender & sexuality

WGS 2559 (DR) Adolescent Girls and Sustainable Development in the Dominican Republic

Amanda Davis

     In this course, we will work to understand the unique and complex challenges girls living in poverty in the Dominican Republic and the wider global south face. We will evaluate the role and impact of policies, institutions, and non-profit organizations in creating economic independence and increased agency for adolescent girls, as well as the effectiveness of gender-specific programming aimed at this population group.  Our focus will be rooted specifically in the Dominican Republic, so that students will have the opportunity to engage in critical, contextually-driven analysis, and also have the chance to take part in meaningful community and service engagement at the local level. 

      The Mariposa DR Foundation will serve as our host for this course, and we will work alongside its founder, lead teachers, volunteers, and more than 150 program participants each day we are there. This organization works to end generational poverty through the empowerment of girls in Cabarete, DR, and features an approach to development and an extensive set of programs that they hope to see replicated in many other regions throughout the world. The course is intended to give students interested in such areas as global development work, transnational feminism, and globalization the chance to engage and learn from grassroots experts in the field. Indeed, learning will consistently extend beyond the classroom with visits to local neighborhoods, participation in girl-centered programming, and engagement with local leaders.

Special Note: STUDY ABROAD OPTION. Does not count toward concentrations.

Course Category:
Global

WGS 2559 (Gender, Body Image) Gender, Body Image and Social Activism

Karlin Luedtke, Amy Chestnutt

What is the relationship between body image and identity? How does one affect, constrain, and inform the other?  The development of body image is a complex process influenced by messages we receive from family, friends, peers, health care practitioners, teachers, and mass media to name a few. Messages are also constructed and interpreted differently depending on one's gender, race, religion, ethnicity, sexual orientation, and ableism.

WGS 2559 (HumSex) Human Sexualities

Lisa Speidel

This course examines human sexuality from psychological, biological, behavioral, social, and historical perspectives. Topics include sexual research and theoretical perspectives, sexual anatomy and physiology, sexual health, intimacy, communication, patterns of sexual response and pleasure and sexual problems and therapies. Course will also include examination of the development of sexuality and the intersections of other identities, gender identity, sexual orientation, sexuality and the law, sexual assault, and other social issues in sexuality. This course will focus on creating a safe environment for honest and authentic conversations about the issues.  Confidentiality and respect will be emphasized to create a community of trust. Students will learn about these issues of sexuality through discussion, experiential activities, film, readings, research, reflective writing and guest speakers.

Course Category:
Sexuality Concentration, Gender Concentration

WGS 2848 Reproductive Technology

This course will focus on issues in technology and reproduction from historical and cross-cultural perspectives.  We will examine critical perspectives on science, power, gender, and inequality as they influence cultural constructions of reproductive processes such as pregnancy, childbirth, infertility, and debates about the enhancement and limitation of human fertility.
This course fulfills the global requirement.

Course Category:
Global, Gender Concentration

WGS 2891 Issues Facing Adolescent Girls

Edith "Winx" Lawrence and Melissa Levy

This course provides an opportunity for students to develop their leadership skills through involvement in academic service learning. Students will explore the psychological, social, and cultural issues affecting adolescent girls and apply this understanding through service with the Young Women Leaders Program (YWLP), a mentoring program that pairs middle school girls with college women for a year. As we delve into theory and research on adolescent development, effective mentoring practices, and leadership development, students will test their theoretical knowledge and its application by serving as a Big Sister to an area middle school girl. The class pays special attention to the ways that racial, economic, and ethnic differences affect girls’ voice and self-concept during this developmental phase.  

Special Note: Instructor Permission. Combined with EDHS 2891 (however WGS majors should sign up under WGS). Internship courses do not count towards either concentration.

WGS 2893 Fostering Leadership in Girls and Women

Jaronda Miller-Bryant

In this course students explore the psychological, social, and cultural issues affecting adolescent girls and apply this understanding through service with the Young Women Leaders Program (YWLP), a mentoring program that pairs middle school girls with college women for a year. A continuation of EDHS/WGS 2891 Issues Facing Adolescent Girls, the 3 credit class in the Fall is for students learning to be facilitators of mentoring groups and developing leadership skills through . Students attend a weekly one-hour class and two-hour mentoring group, and spend four hours a month one-on-one with their mentee. For those not able to mentor, they can meet the class requirements by being involved in the YWLP research team.

Special Note: Internship courses do not count towards either concentration

WGS 2895 Front Lines of Social Change: Through the Lens of Gender, Race and Class

Jaronda Miller

This course is for undergraduate students who have committed to a yearlong internship with the Women’s Center. While analyzing the role of the intersectionality of race, class and gender and the deep connection to advocating for social change, interns will be exposed to experiential learning on Grounds in the community and abroad. We see our interns as ambassadors for the university. The purpose of this course is to give the interns the tools to incorporate scholarship into their internship experience.

Special Note: Internship courses do not count towards either concentration

WGS 2896 Front Lines II

Jaronda Miller

Students will continue to delve into social problems by dividing the course into two parts. The first half of the semester we will focus on four problem areas that have a local and/or global focus: sex trafficking, gender and immigrant status, minority women and mental health, and transgender oppression. The second half of the semester will consist of an externship to local organizations working in the areas we cover in class.  Students need to have taken WGS 2895: Front Lines of Social Change I

1 credit class does not count toward WGS Major/Minor

Special Note: Need to have taken WGS 2895

WGS 2897 Gender Violence and Social Justice

Claire Kaplan

Introduction to dynamics of gender-based violence, the political and cultural structures that perpetuate it, and avenues for achieving social justice. Students will think critically about the (largely) domestic impact of this violence, and develop a practical understanding of how it intersects with other forms of oppression, by applying theory to real-world problems through experiential learning projects in the community and at the University.

Special Note: Internship courses do not count towards either concentration

WGS 3043 Women Writing for Change

Abigail Arnold

Examines the rhetorical choices Western women have made from Medieval times to the present to create public arguments for social change, in the face of cultural pressure to remain silent. Analyzes how women writers deliberately worked with narratives of gender, as well as traditional and alternative texts. Explores how those decisions shape expectations of women in the public sphere today.

Course Category:
Sexuality Concentration

WGS 3100 Women and Freedom of Movement

Farzaneh Milani

The course focuses on the complex interconnectedness between the allocation of space and power. It studies how in the last few decades women in motion desegregated predominantly masculine spaces, reconfigured the boundaries and hierarchies between the sexes, modified definitions of beauty, and altered gender relations. It examines the rhetoric and poetics of sex segregation, voice, visibility, and mobility in a spectrum of genres. 

Special Note: PreReq: 2000 level course in the humanities.

Course Category:
Global, Gender Concentration

WGS 3105 Issues in LGBTQ Studies

Andre Cavalcante

This course is an interdisciplinary analysis of LGBT (lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer) Studies.  We will study  historical events and political, literary, and artistic figures and works; contemporary social and political issues; the meaning and development of sexual and gender identities; and different disciplinary definitions of meaning and knowledge.

Course Category:
Sexuality Concentration

WGS 3110 (Queer American History) Queer American History

Doug Meyer

Course focuses on 20th century history of LGBTQ activism,  but will include formation of heterosexual and homosexual identities and historical constructions of sexual practices prior to the 1900s. From 20th c. the course will focus on the Homophile Movement, Gay Liberation, and ACT UP, among other activist movements. Although primary emphasis will be placed on historical activism, contemporary movements regarding LGBTQ-rights will be included. Will be given a permanent course number in future semesters.

Course Category:
Sexuality Concentration

WGS 3140 Border Crossing: Women’s Literature Middle East & Africa

Farzaneh Milani

This course will focus on a bloodless, non-violent revolution that is shaking the foundation of the Islamic Middle East and North Africa--women's literature. Hidden behind real or imaginary walls, veils, and silences, the Middle Eastern and North African women have suffered yet another distortion of their identity, mainly the critical neglect surrounding their literature.  For centuries, however, and especially in the last few decades, women have made their voices heard through their writings.  They have seized every opportunity to break away from the silence that has veiled them at home or abroad.  This course, in a small way, is an attempt to remedy this oversight.  It examines the rhetoric and poetics of sex segregation, voice, visibility, and mobility in a spectrum of genres that includes folklore, novel, short story, poetry, biography, autobiography, and essay.
This course fulfills the global requirement.

Course Category:
Global, Gender Concentration

WGS 3200 Women, Gender, and Sports: A History of American Female Athletes

Bonnie Hagerman

This course traces the history of American female athletes from the late 1800s through the early 21st century. By gaining an historical understanding of the contributions of female athletes, we will explore the social, political, economic, and cultural constraints that have been placed on sportswomen, and their attempts to transcend such limitations. We will use gender as a means of understanding the evolution of female athletes, and will also trace the manner by which issues of class and race inform sportswomen’s journeys over time, particularly with regard to issues of femininity and homophobia.
This course fulfills the second writing requirement.

Course Category:
Gender Concentration

WGS 3210 Gender, Sport, and Film

Bonnie Hagerman

Sports, and various sports figures, have often been the subject of film – both in documentary form and Hollywood blockblusters. This course will examine how film has incorporated issues of gender, and we will compare those productions that portray women’s sports and the female athlete and see how they stack up against those productions featuring male athletes and men’s sports. We will also explore important intersections of race, sexuality, equality and place as we look to determine what actually makes a film a true “sports film.”

Course Category:
Gender Concentration

WGS 3220 Global Perspectives on Gender & Sport

Bonnie Hagerman

This course will examine female athletes from a global perspective, comparing and contrasting their experiences, and placing them in historical perspective. Among the topics we will consider will be a look at Saudi Arabian sportswomen and their recent entry into the Olympic Games; an examination of the pros and cons of Chinese sports schools; an exploration of the post-apartheid athletic landscape of South Africa, and a discussion of the struggle of Iranian women to compete at the highest levels of sport even as they struggle against clothing restrictions.  As we consider the global experience and how it differs from continent to continent, county to country, and region to region, we will consider not only issues of gender, but race, class, and sexuality as well.
This course fulfills the global requirement.

Course Category:
Global, Gender Concentration

WGS 3230 Gender and the Olympic Games

Bonnie Hagerman

In ancient Greece, women risked death if they participated in or even attended the Olympic Games. As Pierre de Coubertin looked to revive the games in 1896, he thought women better suited to cheering on the male victors, than to competing themselves. This course will explore women’s early participation in the Olympic Games, the pressures upon Olympic sportswomen to be feminine, and the important intersections of race, class, place and sexual orientation. We will also consider the future of the Olympic Games, its global reach, and women’s place in this brave new world, both as athletes and administrators.   This course fulfills the Global Requirement.

Course Category:
Global, Gender Concentration

WGS 3240 Race, Gender and Sport: A History of Black Athletes in America

Hagerman

This course seeks to explore the intersection of gender and race in sport, specifically examining the African-American experience in sport. This course will ask students to consider whether sport was (and continues to be) the great equalizer for both African-American sportsmen and sportswomen, and to evaluate their portrayals (or lack thereof) in both the white and black media. We’ll consider athletic greats Jackie Robinson and Althea Gibson, as well as lesser known athletes Jack Johnson and Ora Mae Washington—why are some athletes destined to be celebrated while others are forgotten? We will also explore the activism of Muhammad Ali and Venus Williams, and the gendered differences of their campaigns, as well as the importance of sport as a platform for voicing inequality as we look not only at breaking color barriers during Jim Crow America, but “The Black Power Salute” of the 1960s, and taking a knee in 2016. Through primary source readings, documentaries and discussion we’ll seek to put the African-American sporting experience in context to see just how far athletes of color have actually come in the American sporting arena.

WGS 3306 Sexuality, Gender, Class and Race in Teen Film

Andrea Press

The focus of this class will be on viewings and analyses of films featuring images of teens produced between 1930 and the present, focusing on the following questions: what is adolescence (and how has it been defined in American film)? What is the range of experience that characterizes American adolescence across gender, race, and class lines? How does it make sense to think about the social influence of films on individuals and society?

Special Note: Combined with MDST 3306

Course Category:
Sexuality Concentration, Gender Concentration

WGS 3310 Sexuality, Gender and Media

Aniko Bodroghkozy

This course examines how television addresses women, how it represents women, and how women respond to the medium. It also examines the relationship between the female audience and television by focusing on both contemporary and historical issues. Areas for examination include: how women have responded to television as technology; how specific genres have targeted women; how female-focused specialty channels have addressed women; and how specific television series and genres have mediated and negotiated the changing social, cultural, political, and economic status of women from the 1950s to the present. The course is particularly interested in charting how television has dealt with the challenges posed by the women’s movement and feminism. Prerequisite: WGS or Media Studies major, 2nd major or minor.

WGS 3340 Transnational Feminism

Amanda Davis

This course places women, feminism, and activism in a transnational perspective, and offers students the opportunity to examine how issues considered critical to the field of gender studies are impacting women’s lives globally in contemporary national contexts. We will look closely at how violence, economic marginality, intersections of race and gender, and varied strategies for development are affecting women in specific geographical locations. 

Course Category:
Global, Gender Concentration

WGS 3350 Gender Politics in Comparative Perspective

Denise Walsh

This course examines how different countries “do” gender, exploring the political, social and economic construction of sexual difference.  Our focus will be on how power is gendered and its effects on women and men in the developing world.  We begin with a theoretical discussion of patriarchy, gender and feminist methods.  Continuing to draw upon these theoretical debates, the course then investigates a series of issues, including gender and state formation in the Middle East, women’s political participation in India and South Africa, feminist and women’s movements in Latin America and Uganda, and globalization in South East Asia.
This course fulfills the global requirement.

Special Note: Combined with PLCP 3350

Course Category:
Global, Gender Concentration

WGS 3370 Feminism in America, 1910-present

Hagerman, B.

This course will explore the history of feminism in America from the 1910s to the present day. We will examine the various philosophies and strategies of people who have allied themselves with the feminist movement as well as those who have opposed it. We will ask how activists imagined sexual equality and what reforms-political, legal, economic, cultural, or psychological-they proposed.
This course fulfills the second writing requirement.

Course Category:
Sexuality Concentration, Gender Concentration

WGS 3409 (also MDST 3409) LGBTQ Issues in the Media

Cavalcante

This course will explore the complex cultural dynamics of LGBTQ media visibility, along with its social, political, and psychological implications for LGBTQ audiences.  It explores four domains:  (1) the question of LGBT media visibility (2) the complex processes of inclusion, normalization, and assimilation in popular culture (3) media industries and the LGBT market (4) the relationship between digital media, LGBT audiences, and everyday life.

Course Category:
Sexuality Concentration

WGS 3440 Gender and Multiculturalism

Alberto McKelligan

Introduces current multiculturalism and feminist scholarship, prompting students to make connections between ideas from a wide variety of disciplines, such as history, sociology, anthropology, literature, art history, area studies, and more.  Students will be required to complete an in-depth research final project for the course.

Course Category:
Global, Gender Concentration

WGS 3450 Gender and Architecture

As a visual art, architecture as an object projects a specific image; as a spatial art it affects individual and group interaction/engagement with the built environment. Through the lenses of gender and race we will examine human relationships to architecture - as designers, patrons, and users – in the public and the private realm and across a broad range of temporal and geographic boundaries. Approaches will include psychoanalysis, critical theory, and social, political, and architectural history.

WGS 3492 Women's Photography and Aesthetics

Claire Raymond

An introduction to feminist theory as refracted through film theory, engaging questions of the representation of women from the particular angle of the representation of women by women. How does the strategy of self representation effect our interpretation of the images? How does woman’s entry into the fine arts through photography in the 19th century echo in the practice and work of 20th century woman photographers?

Special Note: Combined with ISHU and ISSS

Course Category:
Gender Concentration

WGS 3500 Topics in Women, Gender & Sexuality

varies

Special topics in Women, Gender & Sexuality vary by semester.

Special Note: see current semester listing for specific topics

WGS 3500 (Women Writing) Topics in WGS: Women Writing for Change

Abigail Arnold

This course examines the ways in which women, who were largely expected to be silent, have publicly argued for social change from medieval times to the present. Much of the class will emphasize 19th and 20th century American women’s arguments for abolition, civil rights and feminism.  We will look at how writers deliberately worked with/against narratives of gender to craft their arguments, their use of non-traditional genres, and explore how those decisions shape our expectations of women in the public sphere today.

Course Category:
Gender Concentration

WGS 3500(Global Change) Women and Global Change

Abigail Arnold

This course provides an academic and theoretical grounding for understanding the tremendous range of women’s activism from a global perspective, including multi-faceted and culturally specific connections with Western feminism.  We will analyze the cultural, economic and political conditions that promote, inhibit, and incite women’s organizing for change.

WGS 3500(VisArt) Women and the Visual Arts

Alberto McKelligan

This course will provide an introduction to feminist theory and visual culture by focusing on the relationships between several key feminist concerns, including gender, sexuality, and difference.  Readings in the course will examine how these concerns have played a role in the production, distribution, and reception of the visual arts over a wide variety of time periods and geographic locations.  Students will familiarize themselves with historical examples of "feminist artistic practice," as well as contemporary examples of visual culture that continue earlier investigations carried out by previous generations of artists.

Course Category:
Gender Concentration

WGS 3559 Gender and the African-American Experience in Sport

Bonnie Hagerman

This course seeks to explore the intersection of gender and race in sport, specifically examining the African-American experience in sport. This course will ask students to consider whether sport was (and continues to be) the great equalizer for both African-American sportsmen and sportswomen, and to evaluate their portrayals (or lack thereof) in both the white and black media. We’ll consider athletic greats Jackie Robinson and Althea Gibson, as well as lesser known athletes Jack Johnson and Ora Mae Washington—why are some athletes destined to be celebrated while others are forgotten? We will also explore the activism of Muhammad Ali and Venus Williams, and the gendered differences of their campaigns, as well as the importance of sport as a platform for voicing inequality as we look not only at breaking color barriers during Jim Crow America, but “The Black Power Salute” of the 1960s, and taking a knee in 2016. Through primary source readings, documentaries and discussion we’ll seek to put the African-American sporting experience in context to see just how far athletes of color have actually come in the American sporting arena.

Course Category:
Gender Concentration

WGS 3559 (General) New Course in Women, Gender and Sexuality

varies

This course provides the opportunity to offer a new course in the subjects of women, gender and sexualities.

Special Note: see current semester listing for specific topics

WGS 3559 (Incarcerated Women) Incarcerated Women

Amanda Davis

This course centers on the increasing number of women and juvenile girls who are incarcerated in the United States, and the now more than one million women under some form of correctional supervision in America. We will also explore such areas as feminist approaches to women and crime, racialized representations of criminality, and the impact of gender, race, and class on the criminal justice system.

Course Category:
Gender Concentration

WGS 3559 (Olympic) Gender and the Olympic Games

Hagerman

In ancient Greece, women risked death if they participated in or even attended the Olympic Games. As Pierre de Coubertin looked to revive the games in 1896, he thought women better suited to cheering on the male victors, than to competing themselves. This course will explore women’s early participation in the Olympic Games, the pressures upon Olympic sportswomen to be feminine, and the important intersections of race, class, and sexual orientation. We will also consider the future of the Olympic Games, its global reach, and women’s place in this brave new world, both as athletes, as administrators, and as reporters.

Course Category:
Gender Concentration

WGS 3559 (Women's Rights in Modern Italy) Women's Rights in Modern Italy

Francesca Calamita

 

This course explores how modern Italian literature, cinema, and the arts have represented the quest for women’s rights from bodily autonomy to equal pay as well as emergencies related to women’s socio-cultural perception such as the high rate of feminicide, rape and other forms of gender-based violence. What can Italian literature, cinema and arts from the recent past teach us about the global backlash of patriarchy against women in the 2010s?

WGS 3611 History of Gender and Sexuality in America, 1600-1865

Corinne Field

Combined with HUIS 3611
This course explores the significance of gender in the territory of the present-day U.S. during the period from the first European settlements to the Civil War.  We will ask, on the one hand, how people’s ideas about gender structured society and, on the other, how social relations defined what it meant to be a man or a woman.  Readings and discussion will focus on three particular areas of inquiry: the rights and obligations of citizenship; the value and division of labor; and the configuration of emotional life (including familial relationships, erotic desires, and individual aspirations).  Resisting any transhistorical definition of womanhood, we will investigate how Native, European, and African understandings of gender changed over time on the North American continent.  We will pay particular attention to shifting class distinctions and regional differences.
This course fulfills the second writing requirement.

Special Note: Combined with HIUS 3611

Course Category:
Sexuality Concentration, Gender Concentration

WGS 3612 History of Gender and Sexuality in America, 1865-Present

varies

This course will explore the significance of gender in United States from the Civil War to the present.  We will ask how people’s ideas about gender structured society and how social relations defined what it meant to be a man or a woman.  Readings and discussion will focus on three particular areas of inquiry: the rights and obligations of citizenship; the value and division of labor; and the configuration of emotional life (including familial relationships, erotic desires, and individual aspirations).  Resisting any transhistorical definition of womanhood, we will investigate how understandings of gender developed in relation to racial, ethnic, class, and regional differences. 
The goal of this course is to become adept at generating your own historical analysis through the study of primary documents.  The majority of the readings consist of primary sources—letters, diaries, legal documents, and fiction written by or about women in the past.  In addition, you will read a few secondary sources in order to assess how professional historians analyze and employ evidence.  Through short weekly writing assignments and class discussion, you will use these readings to develop your own analytical skills.  Lectures will introduce topics not covered in the readings.  A midterm, a final exam, and a longer (five page) paper will require you to synthesize the readings, lectures, and discussion in order to generate your own arguments about the significance of gender in the American past. 

This course fulfills the second writing requirement.

Special Note: Combined with HIUS 3612

Course Category:
Sexuality Concentration, Gender Concentration

WGS 3621 Coming of Age in America: A History of Youth

Corinne Field

This course will explore the historical experience of young people and the meaning of youth from the colonial period to the late twentieth century. We will analyze how shifting social relations and cultural understandings changed what it meant to grow up. Topics to be explored include work, family, gender, sexuality, education, political involvement, and popular culture.
This course fulflls the second writing requirement.

Course Category:
Sexuality Concentration, Gender Concentration

WGS 3680 / ITTR 3680 Foodscapes in Women’s Writing, Culture and Society

Francesca Calamita

This course explores how Italian women writers have represented food in their short stories, novels and autobiographies in dialogue with the culture and society from late nineteenth century to the present. Looking how cooking and serving meals to others, while denying themselves the pleasure of eating, are depicted in Italian women’s writing helps us understand the role food and food-related-activities have played, and still play, in women’s lives. These lectures will offer a close reading of the symbolic meaning of food in narrative and the way it intersects with Italian women’s socio-cultural history and the feminist movement addressing issues of gender, identity and politics of the body. Taught in English. Satisfies the Second writing requirement.

WGS 3750 Women, Childhood, Autobiography

Lorna Martens

Cross-cultural readings in women’s childhood narratives. Emphasis on formal as well as thematic aspects.

Special Note: may be combined with CPLT and GETR

Course Category:
Gender Concentration

WGS 3770 Women Writers: Women on Women

Lorna Martens

This course focuses on women writers from any era who address the topic of femininity:  what it means or implies to be a woman.

Course Category:
Gender Concentration

WGS 3800 Queer Theory

Doug Meyer

This course introduces students to some of the key and some of the controversial theoretical texts that make up the emerging field of queer theory.  We will consider the beginnings of queer theory and also look at more recent work in fields such as queer gothic and phenomenology. The approach of the course will be interdisciplinary, with an emphasis on literary and aesthetic criticisms that may shift according the instructor's areas of expertise. The goal of the course is to develop critical practice by working through a variety of perspectives, not only across academic disciplines but also across cultures. Insofar as queer theory reads for the often unseen, or submerged, reality embedded in cultural texts, contexts, and literatures, we will engage conscious critical practice in the class:  active reading and informed discussion.
as of Fall 2015: This course fulfils the Second Writing Requirement

Special Note: Queer or Feminist Theory is required for all WGS majors/minors.

Course Category:
Sexuality Concentration

WGS 3810 Feminist Theory

Instructor Varies

This course provides an overview of the historical bases and contemporary developments in feminist theorizing and analyze a range of theories on gender, including liberal, Marxist, radical, difference, and postmodernist feminist theories. We will explore how feminist theories apply to contemporary debates on the body, sexuality, colonialism, globalization and transnationalism. Throughout the course we will incorporate analysis of race, class, and national differences as well as cross-cultural perspectives.

Special Note: This, or Queer Theory, required for all WGS majors and minors.

Course Category:
Gender Concentration

WGS 3820 Feminist Methodologies

Interdisciplinary introduction to qualitative research design from a feminist perspective. Topics include memory, objectivity, confidentiality, ethics, power differentials, feminist epistemology, the status of evidence, and the limits of statistics. Appropriate for students interested in learning interview techniques, narrative analysis, fieldwork, archival work, and how to frame research questions. 

Course Category:
Gender Concentration

WGS 3993 Independent Study

Instructor permission required

Individual student research on topics in women, gender and/or sexuality. A WGS faculty member mentors the student with whom the requirements are agreed upon prior to enrollment. Independent Study classes must be taken for a grade in order to count the credits toward the major.  If you are interested in designing an independent study please approach faculty well in advance.

WGS 4050 Senior Seminar

Capstone course for Women, Gender & Sexuality majors and minors. 

Special Note: See 4000 level clsses designated as Senior Seminar for Spring 2016.

WGS 4100 Readings in Sexuality Studies

Geeta Patel

This course explores key topics that have shaped the field of sexuality studies, with a focus on those that fall under the rubric of "queer studies."  Such topics have included the history of sexuality, scientific racism and critical race theory, cyborgs, biopower, nationalism, colonialism, sexuality and the law, the relationship of sexuality to race and class, and bodily aesthetics.  Students engage a series of rotating interdisciplinary readings that draw upon fiction, poetry, theory, ethnographies, law, philosophy, criticism, film and media studies, music, science and/or economic history.

Special Note: WGS majors and minors preferred, but not required.

Course Category:
Sexuality Concentration

WGS 4101 Issues In Women's Autobiographies

Amanda Davis

This class focuses on women’s autobiographical texts and the diverse ways authors explore issues surrounding identity, power, and resistance in their narratives. We will read compelling accounts of imprisonment, reservation life, political detention, and more, while closely examining women’s participation in ongoing struggles for social justice. Texts by women of color will be placed at the center of study, with detailed readings of autobiographies by African American, Latina, and Native American women in particular.  
Given the sheer number of works that have been produced, this course will concentrate specifically on women’s memoirs of activism and their experiences living on various borders. Students will have the unique opportunity to write their own individual autobiographies or to assemble edited collections of women’s autobiographical writings in an area of their choosing, and thus be able to contribute to women’s activist and intellectual histories as well.

Special Note: This course is a designated WGS Senior Seminar.

Course Category:
Gender Concentration

WGS 4107 Feminism and the Public Sphere

The idea of the public sphere is central to contemporary politics. It is the “space” where citizens exchange ideas and form opinions, and from which these citizens can shape government. It is also a space largely dominated by media in contemporary industrialized societies. Concerns about the impact of the media on politics are often concerns about the health of the public sphere.

Special Note: may be combined with MDST

Course Category:
Gender Concentration

WGS 4110 Gender Non-Conformity in the Media

André Cavalcante

As one of the primary cultural drivers of common sense, shared values, and political ideology, media are certainly influential storytellers. This course creates space for considering media’s role in articulating and fashioning the limits and possibilities of gender identity. We will pay particular attention to representations of gender non-conformity in popular culture such as female masculinity, male femininity, and transgender subjectivity.

Special Note: Co-listed with MDST 4110

Course Category:
Sexuality Concentration, Gender Concentration

WGS 4140 Beyond the Gap: Gender and Political Behavior

Nicholas Winter

This course will consider the theoretical place of gender in American politics. We will also take up a number of topics, including the unavoidable gender gap, the role of masculinity and femininity in conditioning our perceptions of issues and political candidates, the ways gender, politics, and society have interacted historically, and the ways race and gender (and class) interact in conditioning political behavior. Prerequisite: At least one course either on gender or on political behavior.

Special Note: Combined with PLAP 4140

Course Category:
Gender Concentration

WGS 4200 Sex and Gender Go To The Movies

Andrea Press

Over the past several generations, the mass media have become central to our understanding of the meaning of the categories of "woman" and "man" in American life.  In fact, many argue that the mass media have become central to the reproduction of the "sex-gender system" within which we all live, and under whose influence we form our identities as men and women in this culture.  In this course, we will examine the ways in which popular Hollywood film helps to define cultural ideas about gender differences both in the U.S. and globally.  We will also look at the ways in which feminists have responded to these definitions, by criticizing existing media images and by creating some alternatives of their own.
The course will begin by examining the notion that film might influence our development as gendered individuals, looking at those who have argued both for and against this notion.  We will then consider briefly the different forms of feminist theory which exist, and how they have been applied to the study of the mass media.  This introduction will be followed by an examination of the development of images of women and men in film, and an examination of how these images might function for different segments of the female audience.  We will look briefly at the history of popular Hollywood film, the history of its portrayal of women, scholarly criticisms of these portrayals, scholarly discussions of the appeal of specifically "female" genres such as  melodramas or "the woman's film" to the female audience, and of "masculine" films and feminist attempts to create alternatives to mainstream images in various media.  Throughout the course we will consider the issue of the representation of minorities in the dominant media, and examine some newly created alternative representation.
This course fulfills the Second Writing Requirement.

Special Note: Combined with MDST 4200

Course Category:
Gender Concentration

WGS 4240 Rights, Identity and Gender

Denise Walsh

Investigates the conflict over culture and women’s rights and examines a number of proposed solutions.  Issues addressed include the claims of minority communities in liberal states, marriage practices in Africa and the U.S., domestic violence in India, and female genital mutilation.  
This course fulfills the global requirement.

Special Note: Combined with PLCP 4240. Prerequisite: One course in PLCP or permission of the instructor.

Course Category:
Global, Gender Concentration

WGS 4300 Risky Business

Geeta Patel

This course will bring economic notions of risk to thinking about risk in relation to gender, race, class, nation and globalization. Students will be introduced to notions of risk that have traveled with finance and insurance globally. They will also interrogate concepts associated with risk or mediated through risk and insurance. Material in class will range from financial analyses and ethnographic materials to fiction and film.

Course Category:
Gender Concentration

WGS 4350 Comparative Gender Stratification

Rae Blumberg

Examines gender stratification - the relative level of equality of men and women in a given group -  in comparative and cross-historical perspective.  Several theories are presented to explain the variations, from gender-egalitarian to highly patriarchal groups.

This course fulfills the global requirement.

Special Note: Combined with SOC 4350. Prerequisite: WGS or SOC course

Course Category:
Global, Gender Concentration

WGS 4360 Body Politics and the Body Politic

This seminar places feminist and non-feminist debates about body politics—beauty standards, racialization and color politics, transgender movements, body modification, work discipline, commodification, torture, cyborgs, and new corporeal technologies--in the context of a wider universe of political and philosophical writing on embodiment.  Students will be introduced to culturally and historically diverse ways of perceiving, adorning, treating, reconfiguring, and disciplining bodies.  We will consult both ethnographies and a range of analytic sources, from phenomenology to queer theory, Buddhist texts, and the history of science.
This course fulfills the global requirement.

Course Category:
Sexuality Concentration, Gender Concentration

WGS 4420 Women and Education

Eleanor Wilson

The purpose of this course is to explore a variety of issues arising from women's involvement in the field of education. The course will examine the roles women have played and continue to play as students, scholars, and leaders in American educational institutions.

Course Category:
Gender Concentration

WGS 4500 Topics in Women, Gender & Sexuality

varies

Special topics in Women, Gender & Sexuality vary by semester.

Special Note: see current semester listing for specific topics

WGS 4500 (girlhood) The Global History of Black Girlhood

Field, C.

The Black Girls Matter movement has behind it a long history of advocacy by and for black girls.  In recent years, scholars working on the history of black girls in the US, Latin America, the Caribbean and Africa have created a vibrant new field of black girl studies.  Combining insights from black feminism and the history of childhood, these scholars have centered black girls’ experience as a means of reframing our understanding of citizenship, labor, and creativity.  This course will introduce you to this exciting new field by reading foundational texts by historians as well as primary sources authored by black girls.  We will employ a broad chronological scope, beginning with the centrality of girls in the Atlantic slave trade of the seventeenth century and ending with black girls’ activism today.  Taking a global perspective, we will explore the commonalities and differences among black girls’ experiences in various regions.  Themes to be explored include: freedom, slavery, and incarceration; productive and reproductive work; innocence, sexuality, and respectability; spirituality and creativity; citizenship and rights.  Throughout, we will seek to understand both how black girls have defined themselves and how other people have sought to represent, protect, or exploit them. 
This will be a discussion based, writing intensive class.  You will be asked to engage with a range of sources including historical monographs, black feminist theory, slave narratives, legal documents, poetry, and photographs.  You will write short, one-page papers every week that will build towards a final fifteen-page research paper on a topic of your choice related to the history of black girlhood.
Readings will include:
Colleen Vasconcellos, Slavery, Abolition, and Childhood in Jamaica, 1788-1838
Abosede George, Making Modern Girls: A History of Childhood, Labor, and Social Development in Colonial Lagos
Okezi Otovo, Progressive Mothers, Better Babies: Race, Public Health, and the State in Brazil, 1850-1945
LaKisha Michelle Simmons, Crescent City Girls: The Lives of Young Black Women in Segregated New Orleans
Marcia Chatelain, South Side Girls: Growing Up in the Great Migration
Ruth Nicole Brown, Hear Our Truths: The Creative Potential of Black Girlhood
African American Policy Forum, Black Girls Matter: Pushed Out, Overpoliced, and Underprotected
 

Course Category:
Global, Gender Concentration

WGS 4500 (Global Sth) Power, Violence and Inequality and Women in the Global South

Denise Walsh

This course takes a multidisciplinary perspective to examine how power, violence and inequality work against women in the global South and what they are doing about it. We begin by defining violence, which includes not only physical abuse, but also psychological abuse, maldevelopment, marginalization, and lack of access to political, economic, and social resources. The course then focuses on conditions that fuel violence against women in the global South, including colonial rule, civil war, rape culture, and neoliberalism. We conclude by investigating their efforts to respond to and challenge this injustice. The course includes guest speakers from across the College and special events hosted by the Power, Violence and Inequality Collective.

Course Category:
Global, Sexuality Concentration

WGS 4500 (S.Asian Cinema) Desire, Pleasure, Governance, Violence: Gender and Sexuality in South Asian Cinema

Geeta Patel

Gender and sexuality have been seminal to South Asian cinema from its inception.  This course will encompass fiction and documentary, independent movies and small scale movies made in Mumbai, Bengali cinema and the cinemas of the south.  Issues will include transgender activism, family dramas, social and national change, re-envisioned sexualities, the good woman and the courtesan.

Offered under WGS 4559 New Courses Spring 2015

Course Category:
Global, Sexuality Concentration, Gender Concentration

WGS 4500 (ViolenceAgainst) Violence Against Sexuality Minorities

Doug Meyer

This course emphasizes violence against minority groups. Particular attention will be paid to violence against lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) people, although the class will also focus on forms of abuse against other historically-marginalized groups. Topics covered will include racist and sexist violence, sexualized abuse, including rape and sexual assault, domestic violence, and the politics of hate crime.
Offered as WGS 4559 New Course in Spring 2015

Course Category:
Sexuality Concentration

WGS 4559 (All) New Course in Women, Gender & Sexuality

varies

This course provides the opportunity to offer a new topic in the subject of Women, Gender and Sexuality.

Special Note: see current semester listing for specific topics

WGS 4559 (Black Feminist Theory) Black Feminist Theory

Lanice Avery

This course critically examines key ideas, issues, and debates in contemporary Black feminist thought. With a particular focus on Black feminist understandings of intersectionality and womanism, the course examines how Black feminist thinkers interrogate specific concepts including Black womanhood, sexual mythologies and vulnerabilities, class distinctions, colorism, leadership, crime and punishment, and popular culture. 

WGS 4559 (Gender & Sexuality in Islamic Cultures) Gender & Sexuality in Islamic Cultures

Feyza Burak Adli

 

This course examines the politics of gender and sexuality in various Muslim societies since the 19th century. It covers a range of topics and themes, including: historical, theological, political, and anthropological accounts of gender discourse; various feminist movements; and sexuality, marriage,family, masculinity, and LGBTQ issues. Of particular interest is how social and state actors have attempted to mobilize gender for political gain.

Course Category:
Global

WGS 4559 (Latinx Art) Latina and Latin American Women Artists

McKelligan Hernandez

This course will focus on the artistic production, distribution, and reception of modern women artists in the Latin American region, as well as explore the contributions of Latina and Chicana artists in the United States . Through a close examination of particular case studies, students will learn how Latina and Latin American women artists challenged traditional understandings of artistic practice, exploring and critiquing women's social roles in the process.  Issues of race, class, gender, national/cultural identity will be emphasized throughout the course, linking these concepts to the visual and artistic projects of different generations of Latina and Latin American artists. 

Course Category:
Global, Gender Concentration

WGS 4559 (MidEast) Gender and Nationalism in the Middle East

Feyza Burak Adli

This course will provide an overview of the politics of gender and nationalism in the Middle East. We will examine the ways in which nationalism articulates with gender and sexuality. What are the implications of gendered constructions of national identity? How are the discourses of nation-states gendered? How does the state regulate sexuality, family, and citizenship? What are the effects of nationalist discourses on the emergence of new masculinities and femininities? We will analyze women's engagement in politics, feminist movements and civil society. What are the roles of women in nationalist movements? What are the advantages and limits of women’s public participation and empowerment? The course will also cover topics related to gender and nationalism in the Middle East, such as colonialism, postcolonialism, modernity, secularism, and Islamism.

 

Course Category:
Global, Gender Concentration

WGS 4610 LGBTQ Communities: Race, Class, Gender

Doug Meyer

This course examines the historical and continuing role of LGBTQ communities in U.S. society.  Topics covered will include changes that have taken place over time, LGBTQ-rights as a social movement, and homelessness as an LGBTQ-rights issue.  Particular emphasis will be placed on power relations in LGBTQ communities, including the role of racism, classism, and sexism.  

Course Category:
Sexuality Concentration, Gender Concentration

WGS 4650 Gender, Poetry, and Mindfulness

Geeta Patel

The course integrates mindfulness training with interpretation of art, literature, and writing.  Course material is global in scope, incorporating diverse works from Urdu poetry to Japanese haikus, including texts and mindfulness exercises from Tibet. Students will practice mindfulness to enhance their understanding of writers’ and artists’ personal, historical, cultural, and gender perspectives.  

Course Category:
Global, Gender Concentration

WGS 4700 Men and Masculinities

Lisa Speidel

Typically, men are dealt with in a way that casually presents them as representative of humanity.   This course addresses the various ways that men are also “gendered,” and can be the subject of inquiries of gender, sexuality, inequality, and privilege in their own right.
This course fulfills the second writing requirement.

Course Category:
Sexuality Concentration, Gender Concentration

WGS 4800 Gender Based Violence

Lisa Speidel

This course encourages students to engage in critical thought about gender based violence in the United States and to examine the various approaches to and theories of prevention efforts. The structure of the course is divided into three parts. First, the meanings and nature of interpersonal and sexual violence will be established, including the effects of being the target of violence and the intersections of race/ethnicity and sexuality/sexual orientation. Second, the course will focus on the historical meaning of prevention which focused on potential victims, such as the victim control model, risk reduction rhetoric, and self-defense classes. In addition, an analysis of the criminal justice system as a form of prevention will be addressed. The third section of the course will consist of exploring contemporary definitions of prevention and leading national programs focused on changing perpetrator behavior and cultural systems that support gender based violence. These models include the public health model, men as peer educators, social marketing, mentoring programs, bystander intervention curricula, consent campaigns and sex positive education. The discussion will also consist of examining the research on these programs' effectiveness, if they enact change, or in actuality exclude certain populations and/or unknowingly support the cultural systems that perpetuate gender based violence.

Special Note: J-term course does not fill global requirement

Course Category:
Global, Gender Concentration

WGS 4840 Gender Politics in Africa

Denise Walsh

Comprehensive introduction to gender politics in Africa, including gender transformations under imperial rule, gender and national struggles, gender and culture claims, women’s movements and the gendering of the post-colonial state.
This course fulfills the global and second writing requirements.

Course Category:
Global, Gender Concentration

WGS 4998 Senior Thesis I

Majors in Women, Gender & Sexuality (WGS) are encouraged to become Distinguished Majors. Students complete a two-semester written thesis (approximately 30-50 pages in length) in their fourth year under the supervision of a WGS faculty member. The thesis allows students to pursue their own interests in depth and have the intellectual satisfaction of defining and completing a sustained project.  Please see http://wgs.virginia.edu/wgs_distinguished_major for more information.

Special Note: Restricted to WGS Majors Only. WGS permission required.

WGS 4999 Senior Thesis II

Restricted to WGS Distinguished Majors, please visit http://wgs.virginia.edu/wgs_distinguished_major for more information.

Special Note: WGS permission required.

WGS 5140 Advanced Border Crossings: Women, Islam & Lit. in Middle East & N.Africa

Farzaneh Milani

A focus on a bloodless, non-violent revolution that is shaking the foundation of the Islamic Middle East and North Africa, a revolution with women writers at the forefront. An examination of the rhetoric and poetics of sex segregation, voice, visibility, and mobility in a spectrum of genres that includes folklore, novel, short story, poetry, biography, autobiography, and essay. This course section is for graduate students only.

Special Note: Instructor Consent Required

Course Category:
Global, Gender Concentration

WGS 7500 (Approaches) Approaches to Gender and Sexuality Studies

Denise Walsh

An introduction to contemporary feminist and queer theories, intended for graduate students. Offers a survey of contemporary feminist and queer epistemology, subject formation, ethics, and politics, as well as a grounding in the methods of feminist and queer theory.  What is a woman? What is sex? What is gender? What is sexuality?   These and related questions are discussed from multidisciplinary perspectives.

AAS 2224 Black Femininities and Masculinities in the US Media

Lisa Shutt

This course, taught as a lower-level seminar, will address the role the media has played in creating images and understandings of 'Blackness' in the United States, particularly where it converges with popular ideologies about gender.

Special Note: Co-listed as WGS 2224

AAS 3000 Women and Religion in Africa

Cynthia Hoehler-Fatton

This seminar examines women's religious activities, traditions, and spirituality in a number of different African contexts. Drawing on ethnographic, historical, literary, and religious studies scholarship, we will explore a variety of themes and debates that have emerged in the study of gender and religion in Africa. Topics will include gendered images of sacred power; the construction of gender through ritual; sexuality and fertility; and women's agency in indigenous religious movements, Muslim communities and Christian congregations in Africa.

Special Note: Combined with RELA 3000

AAS 3250 MotherLands: Landscapes of Hunger, Futures of Plenty

This course explores the legacy of the "hidden wounds" left upon the landscape by plantation slavery along with the visionary work of ecofeminist scholars and activists daring to imagine an alternative future. Readings, guest lectures, and field trips illumine the ways in which gender, race, and power are encoded in historical, cultural, and physical landscapes associated with planting/extraction regimes such as tobacco, mining, sugar, and corn.

Special Note: Co-listed as WGS 3250

ANTH 2420 Language and Gender

varies

Studies how differences in pronunciation, vocabulary choice, non-verbal communication, and/or communicative style serve as social markers of gender identity and differentiation in Western and non-Western cultures. Includes critical analysis of theory and methodology of social science research on gender and language.

ANTH 2620 Sex, Gender and Culture

Caleb Everett

Examines the manner in which ideas about sexuality and gender are constructed differently cross-culturally and how these ideas give shape to other social phenomena, relationships, and practices.

Special Note: Equivalent to WGS 2559-003 Spring 2015 Semester at Sea

ANTH 2900 The Cultural Politics of American Family Values

Susan McKinnon

This course provides a broad, introductory survey of the range of cultural understandings, economic structures, and political and legal constraints that shape both dominant and alternative forms of kinship and family in the United States.

ANTH 3105 Love and Romantic Intimacies

Allison Alexy

This course offers an introduction to recent anthropological scholarship on romance to examine how intimate relationships shape human experiences. Through readings and films, we investigate the increasingly popular idealization of "companionate marriages," in which spouses are ideally linked by affection. Our examples include queer and straight experiences, and a diversity of racial, cultural, classed, and gendered representations.

ANTH 3129 Marriage, Mortality, and Fertility

John Shepherd

Explores the ways that culturally formed systems of values and family organization affect population processes in a variety of cultures.

ANTH 3370 Power and the Body

George Mentore

Studying the cultural representations and interpretations of the body in society

Special Note: ANTH 1010 or permission of instructor

ANTH 3600 Sex, Gender and Culture

Examines the manner in which ideas about sexuality and gender are constructed differently cross-culturally and how these ideas give shape to other social phenomena, relationships, and practices.

ANTH 5590 (fem and queeer) Topics in Social and Cultural Anthropology: Feminist and Queer Anthropology

James Igoe

This seminar engages gender and sexuality from anthropological, and thus cross-cultural perspectives. We will draw from diverse conversations in and across feminist and queer theory, broadly construed, particularly (though not exclusively) the works of anthropologists. Issues, questions and topics include (but are not limited to): positionality, intersectionality, post-colonialism, feminist and queer archeology, contact zones, feminist and queer critiques of socio-biology and nature, performativity, practice theory, and ethnography of self. In addition to these theoretical explorations, we also consider strategies for teaching and learning about gender and sexuality in classrooms that are also often complex contact zones (spaces in which people from diverse backgrounds are brought together in conversation). Advanced undergraduates and students from disciplines other than anthropology are welcome to enroll.

ARAB 4230 Love, War & Diaspora in Hoda Barakat's Writing

Al-Samman

In this course, we will examine the themes of love, war, and diaspora in the literature of the Lebanese writer, Hoda Barakat. Some of the topics that will interest us are: the role of the author as a witness to the Lebanese civil war, the challenges of rewriting history, recreating the homeland's image in diasporic locales, collective and individual memories and its role in trauma recall and testimony.

ARTH 2361 19th Century European Art: Gender and Genre

Sarah Betzer

A thematic survey of European art in the long nineteenth century, the course examines the work of German, French, Italian, British and Scandinavian artists, among them Boucher, Vien, David, Friedrich, Ingres, Gericault, Delacroix, Courbet, Manet, Whistler, Van Gogh, Gauguin, Munch, and others. Key course themes will include artistic training and practice, exhibition, and art-theoretical debates of the period.

ARTH 3251 Gender and Art in Renaissance Italy

Examines how notions of gender shaped the production, patronage, and fruition of the visual arts in Italy between 1350 and 1600. Prerequisite: A previous course in art history or gender studies.

ARTH 3491 Women Photographers and Feminist Aesthetics

Claire Raymond

This course explores the question of whether there might be something called a 'feminist aesthetics.' We look at the work of a handful of women photographers, and read criticism about photography, to leverage our exploration into feminist aesthetics. The course works within the frame of feminist discourse. It presents the work of a small number of photographers whose work we will interpret in conjunction with readings in criticism and theory.

ARTR 3350 Introduction to Arab Women's Literature

Hanadi Al-Samman

A comprehensive overview of contemporary Arab women's literature, this course examines all Arab women's literary genres starting from personal letters, memoirs, speeches, poetry, fiction, drama, to journalistic articles and interviews. Selected texts cover various geographic locales and theoretical perspectives. Special emphasis will be given to the issues of Arab female authorship, subjectivity theory, and to the question of Arab feminism

Special Note: Combined with ARTR 5350

ASL 2300 Women and Gender in the Deaf World

Examines the roles of deaf women inside and outside of the signing Deaf community. Using an interdisciplinary approach, considers such topics as language and cultural barriers, violence against women, sexuality, race, class, education, and work. Investigates disparities between deaf and hearing women and the choices available to d/Deaf women, individually and collectively, in contemporary culture. No prior knowledge of Deaf culture or ASL is required for this course.

Special Note: Combined with WGS 2300

CHTR 3840 Writing Women in Modern China

Charles Laughlin

This seminar focuses on works of fiction from modern China that articulate womanhood from a variety of perspectives. In addition to women writers (Qiu Jin, Ding Ling, Eileen Chang, Xi Xi, Chen Ran, Zhu Tianxin), male writers such as Xu Dishan, Mao Dun, and Lao She who devote unusual attention to feminine subjectivity are also included. Familiarity with Chinese culture and society and literary analysis are preferred, but not required.

CPLT 3590 (Fem Ethics) Topics in Comparative Literature: Feminist Ethics

Bennett

Special Note: Co-listed with GETR 3590-002: Courses in English: Feminist Ethics

CPLT 3750 Women, Childhood, Autobiography

Lorna Martens

Cross-cultural readings in women’s childhood narratives. Emphasis on formal as well as thematic aspects.

Special Note: May be combined with WGS 3750 and GETR 3750

ENAM 3750 Sex and Sentiment

Emily Ogden

Focuses on the rise of sentimental novels and sensational novels between the American Revolution and the Civil War. "Do's and Don'ts for the Unmarried Woman" would be a fitting subtitle for many of the best-selling novels of nineteenth-century America.  The texts we study in this course point out the paths that lead to Christian virtue, matrimony, and a happy home, and warn against the transgressions—especially sex out of wedlock—that lead to prostitution and the grave.  Why do these novels matter now, when sexual morals have changed so much? Of course, they tell us something about the limitations on women's lives in an earlier period.  But they also have a lot to say about what it means, more generally, to be a human being with some freedom of choice. They ask how we know when to act on our desires, and when to refrain; they wonder how much willpower we need to get by; they ask how to make a good life when cast out in the wide, wide world. Nineteenth-century stories of women's lives are about more than what women should do with their virginity; they are about what anyone should do with his or her free will. Course texts may include tales of sentiment like Catharine Maria Sedgwick's A New-England Tale and Maria Susanna Cummins' The Lamplighter; and narratives of scandal, sex, and seduction like Susanna Rowson's Charlotte Temple, George Thompson's City Crimes, and William Wells Brown's Clotel.

ENAM 4814 African American Women Authors

Angela Davis

We will read several novels and short stories by African American women, examining in particular how the authors portray black women as individuals and in the context of American society. This course requires active class participation, two written responses to readings (each 2 to 3 double spaced typed pages long) and a formal essay (12 to 15 pages long). The reading list is: Zora Neale Hurston, Their Eyes Were Watching God; Ntozake Shange, For Colored Girls; Toni Morrison, Sula, and Tar Baby; Alice Walker, In Love and Trouble; Paule Marshall, Brown Girl, Brownstones; Gloria Naylor, The Women of Brewster Place. Prerequisite: The course is first offered to fourth year majors in English, Women's Studies and Afro-American and African Studies.

ENCR 3810 Feminist Theories and Methods

Susan Fraiman

Introduces current feminist scholarship in a variety of areas literature, history, film, anthropology, and psychoanalysis, among others pairing feminist texts with more traditional ones. Features guest speakers and culminates in an interdisciplinary project. For more details on this class, please visit the English department website at http://www.engl.virginia.edu/courses.

ENCR 4500 - 001(Fem Theory) Advanced Studies in Literary Criticism: Feminist Theory

Susan Fraiman

An introduction to American feminist criticism and theory.  This course pairs novels and other works by women with theoretical essays in order to contrast diverse feminist approaches. I expect to explore such themes as looking/voyeurism, mother-daughter relations, mobility/migration, incarceration/escape, and conflicts/commonalities among women.  We will also broach such theoretical issues as how to periodize the development of feminist theory, the contributions of queer theory, the logic of canon formation, the meanings of third-wave feminism, and the way gender intersects with other axes of identity (race, sexuality, class, etc.).  Possible primary texts (still very tentative) include Jane Eyre (1847), Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl (1861), The Well of Loneliness (1928), Mona in the Promised Land (1997), a contemporary film, graphic narrative, and popular romance.  Probable theorists include Laura Mulvey, Eve Sedgwick, Susan Stanford Friedman, Chandra Mohanty, and Judith Butler, among a great many others.  5-page paper, 10-page paper, and a final exam.  Please contact me in advance if you would like to be put on my (non-electronic) waiting list.

ENEC 3200 18th Century Women Writers

varies

During the eighteenth century, social, economic, and technological developments converged to alter the ways in which texts were produced and consumed. The result of these innovations was a new “print culture” that offered women the opportunity to step onto the public stage as professional authors for the first time. Female authors, nevertheless, remained intensely aware of their “delicate situation” within the literary public sphere. They responded to this situation by deploying a variety of authorial strategies that ingeniously combined self-promotion with self-protection in order to legitimize their appearance in print. The focus of this class will be the relationship between gender and genre, on how various literary forms popular during the eighteenth century (conduct literature, drama, poetry, the novel) implicated gender in complex ways. Class requirements include weekly reading responses (1-2 pages), frequent “pop” quizzes, two formal essays (5-7 pages), and a final exam. Our class meeting will be largely discussion based.

ENLT 2547.001 (Black Women) Black Writers in America: Black Women Writers in America

Lisa Woolfork

This course explores the range of Black women’s writing from mid-century to the present.  We will focus closely on the text’s adherence to its contemporary literary and social conventions.  We will also consider patterns of representation established in the 1950s and consider how they develop, disintegrate, or evolve into the present day.  Do certain issues or themes remain important in Black women’s writing of the last fifty years?  How has the literature adapted in response to specific cultural or historical moments?

ENLT 2552 Women in Literature: various topics

varies

Analyzes the representations of women in literature as well as literary texts by women writers. For more details on which topics are being offered this semester, visit the English Department website: http://www.engl.virginia.edu/courses.

ENLT 2552.001(Austin) Women in Literature: Austen & Her Contemporaries

Kelly Fleming

Before Jane Austen’s place in the literary canon was a truth universally acknowledged, she was just another woman novelist writing at the end of the eighteenth century. This course will re-position Jane Austen’s novels within the context of the eighteenth-century novel and the writing of her contemporaries Frances Burney, Elizabeth Inchbald, and Maria Edgeworth. Just before the appearance of Austen’s quaint assemblies and country houses, Burney, Inchbald, and Edgeworth were writing about wild masquerades, the pleasures of shopping, and the surprises of London life. However, they also described “female difficulties” in detail: the sexual harassment women experienced in public spaces, the restraints placed upon them by propriety, and the state of dependence in which they lived.
Placed in the context of the eighteenth century, Austen’s novels stand out, provoking new and exciting questions about both Austen and her contemporaries. Why do Austen’s contemporaries refuse to call their works “novels”? Why does the epistolary novel fall out of fashion? What is the significance of Austen setting all of her novels in the country?  Why doesn’t Austen describe women dueling in breeches, the seduction of Catholic priests, or monkey attacks?  Other topics we will consider are: the history of a young lady novel, the anxieties of female authorship, the gothic, the dos and don’ts of female conduct, the rules of eighteenth-century fashion, and the impact of British imperialism on the novel.

ENMC 3160 20th Century Women Writers

Studies fiction, poetry, and non-fiction written by women in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. For more details on this class, please visit the English department website at http://www.engl.virginia.edu/courses.

ENNC 3500 (depending on topic) 19 th C. Topics: Victorian Women Writers

Mazur

ENSP 2810 Women and Media in the Global South

Goff, L.

This course examines women and media in the Middle East, South Asia, and North Africa through the lenses of new media, journalism, feminism, and gender studies, with cross-cultural comparisons to the U.S.

GETR 3590 (Topic: Comm Gdr) Courses in English: Communicating Gender

Sybil Scholz

Reading and discussion of German texts compared to texts from other literatures (all in English translation), with the aime of illuminating a central theoretical, historical, or social issue that transcends national boundaries. For more details on this class, please visit the department website at : http://www.virginia.edu/german/Undergraduate/Courses.

 
 

HIEA 4501 (depending on topic) Seminar in East Asian History: Women and the Family in Pre-modern Chinese History

Cong Ellen Zhang

This seminar introduces the major issues concerning family and women/gender in pre-modern Chinese history. It will discuss the traditional kinship and family structure, Confucian gender norms, familial relations, social constructions of marriage, and women’s roles in the family. The course will take a combined chronological and thematic approach, with each week focusing on a major topic. Course requirements include active participation in class discussion and a 25 page research paper.  Course satisfies Global Perspectives requirement.

HIEU 3341 Society & the Sexes in Europe I

Erin Rowe

Explores the changing constructions of gender roles and their concrete consequences for women and men in society; uses primary texts and secondary studies from late antiquity through the Reformation.

HIEU 3342 Society and the Sexes in Europe II

varies

Explores the changing constructions of gender roles and their concrete consequences for women and men in society; uses primary texts and secondary studies from the 17th century to the present.

HISA 3121 History of Women in South Asia

Richard Barnett

Surveys the evolving definitions and roles of women in the major social and cultural traditions of South Asia, i.e., India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, and Sri Lanka.

HIST 3559-001(JewWomen) New Course in General History: History of Jewish Women

Hanna Schmidt Hollaender

After an introduction into gender studies and women’s history, this course explores the experiences of Jewish women over the course of three centuries of Jewish communal existence in Western and Eastern Europe, the United States, and Israel, following the assumption that their history was distinctive as Jews and as women.  The course will focus on Jewish women’s encounters with modernity. We will analyze women’s lives, occupations, and thoughts, their impact on Jewish and gentile societies, and the perception of their changing roles among Jews and gentiles. Class discussion will be based on sources and scholarly literature, as well as a selection of literary texts, artwork, and films

HIST 4501 (Depending on Topic) Major Seminar

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The major seminar is a small class (not more than 15 students) intended primarily but not exclusively for history majors who have completed two or more courses relevant to the topic of the seminar. The work of the seminar results primarily in the preparation of a substantial (ca. 25 pages in standard format) research paper. Some restrictions and prerequisites apply to enrollment. See a history advisor or the director of undergraduate studies.

HIUS 3150 Salem Witch Trials

Benjamin Ray

The seminar will examine the historical scholarship, literary fiction, and primary source materials relating to the infamous Salem witch trials of 1692 and enable students to work with all the original sources.

Special Note: Must be Religious Studies, American Studies, English, WGS, or History Majors.

HIUS 3611 Gender & Sexuality in America, 1600-1865

Corinne Field

This course explores the significance of gender in the territory of the present-day U.S. during the period from the first European settlements to the Civil War.  We will ask, on the one hand, how people’s ideas about gender structured society and, on the other, how social relations defined what it meant to be a man or a woman.  Readings and discussion will focus on three particular areas of inquiry: the rights and obligations of citizenship; the value and division of labor; and the configuration of emotional life (including familial relationships, erotic desires, and individual aspirations).  Resisting any transhistorical definition of womanhood, we will investigate how Native, European, and African understandings of gender changed over time on the North American continent.  We will pay particular attention to shifting class distinctions and regional differences. 
This course fulfills the Second Writing Requirement.

Special Note: Combined with WGS 3611

HIUS 3612 Gender and Sexuality in America, 1865 to the present

Corinne Field

Studies the evolution of women’s roles in American society with particular attention to the experiences of women of different races, classes, and ethnic groups.
This course fulfills the Second Writing Requirement.

Special Note: Combined with WGS 3612

ITAL 4350 Representations of Women in Italian Literature

Adrienne Ward

Images of women as presented in major Italian literary works from the Medieval period to the 20th century. Areas in which gender issues will be examined include authorship, genre, feminist literary criticism, and representation theory. 

Special Note: ITAL 2020 or its equivalent or instructor approval

JPTR 3290 Feminist Fictions in Japanese Court

Gustav Heldt

Combined with JPTR 5290.
This seminar will take up the world's earliest instance of literature written extensively by, for, and about women, including such famous works as the Pillow Book of Sei Shonagon and Sarashina Diary, among others. The focus will be on reading gender as a fictional enactment of desire and identity that is performed through acts of writing and reading. No prior knowledge of Japanese language or literature is required. 

JPTR 3300 Love in Modern Japanese Fiction

Michiko Wilson

This seminar examines how modern male writers of Japanese prose fiction have approached the western concepts of love and sexual equality, first introduced to Japan in the late 1800s (Meiji, 1868-1912).

Special Note: Satisfies Non-Western and Second Writing Requirement

JPTR 3390 Modern Women Writers Speak Their Minds

Michiko Wilson

This seminar will examaine modern Japanese women’s fiction and critical essays that represent a primer to Japan’s conflicted socio-cultural-gender history in light of the country’s complex psychological relationship to the West. The focus will be on a Japan that is far from the stereotypical image of a conformist and homogenerous society. No prior knowledge of Japanese language or literature is required.

KRTR 3390 Gender in Modern Korean Lit & Film

Susie Kim

This seminar explores the issue of gender and representations of women in modern/contemporary Korea through films and/or literature.

MDST 3306 Sexuality, Gender, Class and Race in Teen Film

Andrea Press

The focus of this class will be on viewings and analyses of films featuring images of teens produced between 1930 and the present, focusing on the following questions: what is adolescence (and how has it been defined in American film)? What is the range of experience that characterizes American adolescence across gender, race, and class lines? How does it make sense to think about the social influence of films on individuals and society?

Special Note: Combined with WGS 3306

MDST 3407 Racial Borders & American Cinema

Shilpa Dave

The history of American cinema is inextricably and controversially tied to the racial politics of the U.S. This course will explore how images of racial and ethnic minorities such as African Americans, Jews, Asians, Native Americans and Latino/as are reflected on screen and the ways that minorities in the entertainment industry have responded to often limiting representations.

MDST 4107 Feminism & the Public Sphere

Jennifer Petersen

This class will examine the normative basis of the public sphere and critiques of its current structure and ask: What would a more inclusive vision of political participation and communication look like? In attempting to build an answer, we will examine a number of works on communication ethics, politics and media, with an emphasis on feminist and queer scholarship.

Special Note: Combined with WGS 4107

MDST 4110 Gender Non-Conformity in the Media

Andre Cavalcante

As one of the primary cultural drivers of common sense, shared values, and political ideology, media are certainly influential storytellers. This course creates space for considering media’s role in articulating and fashioning the limits and possibilities of gender identity. We will pay particular attention to representations of gender non-conformity in popular culture such as female masculinity, male femininity, and transgender subjectivity.
This course fulfills the second writing requirement.

Special Note: Co-listed with WGS 4110

MDST 4200 Sex and Gender go to the Movies

Andrea Press

This course will examine the ways in which different mass media help to define our cultural ideas about gender differences and the ways in which feminist scholars have responded to these definitions by criticizing existing media images and by creating some alternatives of their own. The course will examine the notion that the mass media might influence our development as gendered individuals and consider different forms of feminist theory.

This course fulfills the second writing requirement.

 

Special Note: Often Combined with WGS 4200

MESA 2360 Women and Social Media in the Middle East and South Asia

Lisa Goff

This course will examine media depictions of women during and after revolutions and uprisings in five selected countries (Iran, Egypt, Saudi Arabia, India, and Pakistan), and explore how women in those countries have used social media to embrace, rebut, or amplify those depictions.  It will pay special attention to the ways in which social media facilitate, or possiblylimit, women’s roles as producers and creators of culture.  

 

MUSI 4519 Critical Studies of Music: depending on topic

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Selected topics, announced in advance, exploring the study of music within critical frameworks.  Prerequisite: Instructor permission.

MUSI 4519 (Topic: Music,Gender, Sound, Body) Critical Studies of Music: Music, Gender, Sound, Body

Bonnie Gordon

Can you hear gender?  How does sound influence cultural understandings of Gender? What happens when boys' voices change?  Why do so many operas end with women singing themselves to death?  Why could nuns sing in the seventeenth century while women could not participate in public performances? This interdisciplinary seminar explores these issues and more.   Through readings, class presentations, discussions, blog posts, and analytical papers, you will develop your own understanding of key methodologies and terms used by music scholars and critics, gender theorists, and activists. You will apply what you have learned to musical traditions and soundscapes that particularly interest you. Class discussions will push all of us to challenge our assumptions about music, sound, gender, sex, and sexuality.

MUSI 4519 (Topic: Trauma,Shame) Critical Studies in Music: Trauma, Shame, and Mourning

Fred Maus

The course, “Trauma, Shame, and Mourning,” addresses relations between music and concepts drawn from psychology and sociology. We often associate music with pleasure and entertainment, but many kinds of music have strong connections with painful, complicated psychological states and life events. Topics about trauma will include uses of music therapy to help traumatized clients, including children in wartime, survivors of sexual abuse, and a man dying of AIDS; the autobiography of a concert pianist who survived sexual abuse; the suppression and expression of trauma in feminist popular music; and music in relation to slavery, the Holocaust, and 9-11. In reading about shame, we will consider performance anxiety and the relations of music, stigma, and homosexuality. In thinking about mourning, we will consider whether responses to death have a transcultural musical style; we will consider the history of funeral music; and we will consider musical responses to AIDS.
Because the organization of the course is thematic, we will consider a wide range of musical material, including popular music, historical classical music, and large-scale recent compositions by John Corigliano, John Adams, and Steve Reich. We will read extensively from professional literatures in psychology, music therapy, and sociology as well as musicology.

NUCO 3600 Nursing Care of Women and Childbearing Families

Emily Drake and Mary Gibson

Department consent required
Explores issues of health and wellness for women and the childbearing family, major health challenges affecting women, and the recognition and management of complications and risk factors occurring during the reproductive period. Clinical placement includes hospital and community settings.

Special Note: Prereqs: NUCO 2110, 2120, 2310, or NUIP 2240.

PHIL 3780 Reproductive Ethics

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The focus of the course will be the exploration of various moral, legal and policy issues posed by efforts to curtail or enhance fertility through contraception, abortion, and recent advances in reproductive technology.  Topics for discussion include:
Recent work on abortion; assisted reproductive technologies (including the right to reproduce and its limits, in vitro fertilization, contract pregnancy, gamete donation, and cloning); the ethics of outsourcing surrogate parenting to developing countries; the concept of reproductive responsibility; harming future persons and Parfit’s “non-identity problem;” a critical examination of the concepts of coercion, exploitation, and commodification as deployed in debates over new reproductive technologies; and the disabilities rights critique of genetic screening and selective abortion. This course is open to all undergrads, second year or higher, who have taken at least one prior course in ethics or political philosophy from any department (this includes RELG 2650). Instructor permission required.
This course fulfills the second writing requirement.

Special Note: At least one prior course in ethics or political philosophy from any department (including RELG 2650)

PLAP 3650 Gender Politics

Examines the legal and political status of women, and the politics of changes in that status. How are gender identities forged, and how do they affect law, public policy, political rhetoric, and political movement? Explores, more generally, the clash between 'difference' and 'equality' in democratic societies, using gender as a case-study.  Prerequisite: Two social science courses or instructor permission.

PLAP 4140 Gender and American Political Behavior

Nick Winter

This course will consider the theoretical place of gender in American politics. We will also take up a number of topics, including the unavoidable gender gap, the role of masculinity and femininity in conditioning our perceptions of issues and political candidates, the ways gender, politics, and society have interacted historically, and the ways race and gender (and class) interact in conditioning political behavior. Prerequisite: At least one course either on gender or on political behavior.

PLAP 4141 Sex Differences: Biology, Culture, Politics and Policy

An exploration of sex and gender differences in traits such as sexuality, cognition, nurturance, and aggression with a consideration of their causes, significance, and political/policy implications. 

Special Note: Prerequisite: Instructor permission.

PLCP 3350 Gender Politics in Comparative Perspective

Denise Walsh

This course examines how different countries “do” gender, exploring the political, social and economic construction of sexual difference.  Our focus will be on how power is gendered and its effects on women and men in the developing world.  We begin with a theoretical discussion of patriarchy, gender and feminist methods.  Continuing to draw upon these theoretical debates, the course then investigates a series of issues, including gender and state formation in the Middle East, women’s political participation in India and South Africa, feminist and women’s movements in Latin America and Uganda, and globalization in South East Asia. 

Special Note: Combined with WGS 3350

PLCP 4840 Gender Politics in Africa

Denise Walsh

Investigates the ways social structures and institutions shape gender in sub-Saharan Africa, with an emphasis on the state. Topics include gender in the pre-colonial and colonial era, contemporary African women's movements, women in politics, development, HIV/AIDS and sexuality.

PLPT 4200 Feminist Political Theory

Laurie Balfour

Studies modern and contemporary feminist theories of political life.

Special Note: One previous course in political theory or instructor permission.

PSYC 4603 Psychology of Sexual Orientation

Charlottes Patterson

Overview of research and theory related to sexual orientation across the lifespan from the standpoint of the social sciences. Topics include conceptualization of sexual identities, origins and development of sexual orientation, sexual identity formation and disclosure. Selected issues such as couple relationships, employment and careers, parenthood, and aging are also explored, since they may be affected by sexual orientation.

Special Note: 3rd or 4th year psychology major or instructor permission

RELA 3000 Women and Religion in Africa

Cynthia Hoehler-Fatton

This seminar examines women’s religious activities, traditions and spirituality in a number of different African contexts.  Drawing on ethnographic, historical, literary, and religious studies scholarship, we will explore a variety of themes and debates that have emerged in the study of gender and religion in Africa.  Topics will include gendered images of sacred power; the construction of gender through ritual; sexuality and fertility; and women’s agency in indigenous religious movements, Muslim communities and Christian congregations in Africa.
 

Special Note: Combined with AAS 3000

RELB 3150 Seminar in Buddhism and Gender

Karen C. Lang

This seminar takes as its point of departure Carolyn Bynum's statements: "No scholar studying religion, no participant in ritual, is ever neuter. Religious experience is the experience of men and women, and in no known society is this experience the same." The unifying theme is gender and Buddhism, exploring historical, textual and social questions relevant to the status of women and men in the Buddhist world from its origins to the present day.

RELC 3150 Salem Witch Trials

Benjamin Ray

The seminar will examine the historical scholarship, literary fiction, and primary source materials relating to the infamous Salem witch trials of 1692 and enable students to work with all the original sources.

Special Note: Must be Religious Studies, American Studies, English, WGS, or History Major.

RELC 3559 New Courses in RELC: God, Love and Sin in the Middle Ages

Hawthorne, L.

This course explores Western Christian thought during the Middle Ages, beginning with Augustine at the end of late antiquity through the early fifteenth century. We will examine the theological works and historical context of authors throughout the period, paying particular attention to their ideas about divine love, human sin, and gender. In addition to Augustine, we will read works by Anselm of Canterbury, Bernard of Clairvaux, Peter Abelard, Hildegard of Bingen, Thomas Aquinas, Catherine of Siena, and Julian of Norwich. The course will encourage you to develop your skills as a scholarly thinker, researcher, and writer. The readings and discussions will be challenging, but the instructor will provide guidance and encourage student interaction and collaboration. Students of all years and majors are encouraged to enroll. Contact the instructor to discuss the class.

RELC 3675 Gender and Power in Ancient & Medieval Christianity

Why were women excluded from the priestly hierarchy of the church? How did male clerics subsequently circumscribe women's roles in the church? And how did women respond? These are the questions that we will explore in this course on the intersection between gender and power in pre-modern Christianity.

Special Note: Satisfies Historical Requirement

RELC 3685 Christianity, Gender and Sexuality

Paul Jones

This class engages debates about Christianity, gender, and sexuality in past and present. Topics addressed include: biblical treatments of sex, gender, and sexuality; theological views of the human in patristic, medieval, and modern theology; Christianity, feminism, and feminist theology; sexuality and sexual ethics; and queer theology.

RELC 4610 Sex and Morality

Portmann, J.

How have Jewish and Christian morals shaped sexual experience in the West?  Focusing on the United States today, we will analyze pre-marital sex, the sexual revolution, abortion, prostitution, gay marriage, marital rape, teaching sex education in public schools, and “senior sex.”  We will pay special attention to art, film, and the media in challenging sexual mores.
 
What does sexual activity have to do with religious practice?  How will we theorize or understand sexual desires we don’t share?  How appropriate is it for the government to legislate sexuality?  What is the future of sex in America?

RELJ 3390 Jewish Feminism

Vanessa Ochs

What happened when feminists, female and male, addressed the secondary status of women within traditional Jewish religion? A revolutionary transformation has taken place, and it is still ongoing. This course will be of interest to all who study how contemporary ethical concerns challenge and refine traditional religions.

RELJ 3430 Women in Judaism

Elizabeth Alexander

This course explores the role of women in Judaism as understood by classical Jewish sources and as reconceived by key feminist thinkers in the modern era. Starting with the classical sources, this course familiarizes students with talmudic sources that touch on various aspects of women's lives. We begin with the observation that classical Jewish sources imagine sexuality as a potent creative force, and then explore a number of derivative questions affecting the status and lives of women. How did this positive embrace of sexuality affect the place accorded women in Jewish society? Was female sexuality imagined in different terms than male sexuality? Were women seen to interfere with men's religious lives or enhance it? Was there a domain of women's religious experiences that was distinct from men's? We will analyze both legal and narrative texts for answers to our questions. Other topics treated include: control and protection of women's sexuality, the economics of women's labor, rituals of the body and the modes of expression characteristic of classical Jewish sources. In the last section of the course we will review contemporary attempts by key feminist Jewish thinkers (Plaskow, Adler and Ross) to rethink women’s roles in the religion.

SAST 3300 The Pleasures of Bollywood: Melodrama, Realism, Mythos

Geeta Patel

This class will focus on cinema produced by the industry in Mumbai, popularly called Bollywood. Topics will include the relationship between fiction and documentation, between melodrama and realism, music and affect.  Students will be taught the tools of film analysis and will be expected to watch and unpack films each week.  They will also be expected to consider films in the social, political and economic contexts in which they were made.  
 

SATR 3000 Women Writing India and Pakistan, 1947-present

Mehr Farooqi

We will read and critique the fiction and poetry of culturally specific regions while reflecting on the assumption that experiences and identities are fundamentally gendered.  We will explore issues associated with women writing in regional languages to writing in mainstream languages like Hindi, Urdu and English.  We will also examine how the publication and dissemination of women's texts are related to the women movements in India and Pakistan.

SLFK 2120 Ritual and Family Life

Anne Ingram

Open to students with no knowledge of Russian. Studies the rituals of birth, marriage, and death as practiced in 19th-century peasant Russia and in Russia today and the oral literature associated with these rituals. Topics include family patterns, child socialization and child rearing practices, gender issues, and problems of the elderly in their 19th century and current manifestations.

SOC 2052 Sociology of the Family

Allison Pugh

Comparison of family organizations in relation to other social institutions in various societies; an introduction to the theory of kinship and marriage systems.

SOC 2320 Gender and Society

Blumberg

This course will address how gender shapes our daily lives and interactions with the world. It will provide an introduction to major themes in the sociology of gender. This course is a large lecture course with mandatory discussion sections. 

SOC 2380 Violence and Gender

Claire Raymond

This course takes an interdisciplinary approach to interrogating links between gender and violence. We will focus on representations of violence and theories of subjectivity in response to violence, querying how gender inflects the event and aftermath of violence.

SOC 3100 Feminist Theory

Claire Raymond

Feminist Theory offers a focused exploration of ways that late 20th Century and early 21st Century feminist theorists challenge, alter and deploy central concerns and paradigms of Western cultural assumption. Although Feminist Theory as a category incorporates interdisciplinary and global perspectives, the slant of this course is a focus on Western culture and Feminist Social Theory

Special Note: This course does not take the place of the WGS Theory course required of WGS Majors and Minors.

SOC 3306 Sexuality, Gender, Class and Race in the Teen Film

Andrea Press

The focus of this class will be on viewings and analyses of films featuring images of teems produced between 1930 and the present, focusing on the following questions: what is adolescence (and how has it been defined in American film)? What is the range of experiences that characterizes American adolescence across gender, race and class lines? How does it make sense to think about the social influence of films on individuals and society?

SOC 4350 Comparative Gender Stratification

Rae Blumberg

Examines gender stratification - the relative level of equality of men and women in a given group - in comparative and cross-historical perspective.  Several theories are presented to explain the variations, from gender-egalitarian to highly patriarchal groups.

Special Note: Requires 6 credits of Sociology or instructor permission.

SOC 4600 Gender and Culture

Corse

Studies how the social definition of gender affects and is affected by cultural artifacts such as literature, movies, music, and television. Students are expected to be familiar with general sociological concepts and theory and be regularly prepared for participation in a demanding seminar. 

Special Note: Prerequisite: Six credits of sociology or instructor permission.

SOC 5320 Sociology of Gender

Allison Pugh

This course will explore the social construction and consequences of gender, covering such topics as work, care, sexuality, identity, politics and inequality.  Readings will include the classics as well as newer works in the field.

Special Note: Prereq: Graduate status; six credits in sociology or permission from the instructor.

SPAN 4310 Latin-American Women Writers from 1900 to present

María-Inés Lagos

Study of major Latin American women writers from 1900 to the present—poets, essayists, playwrights, and fiction writers. We will read works by authors of various generations and countries as well as essays on gender theory. Discussion will focus on the literary representation of issues related to gender and culture, with emphasis on how women from various backgrounds have articulated their female experience in societies that establish strong differences between the roles of men and women. Films and other audiovisual materials will be used to illustrate the social and cultural context. Class participation, oral presentation, two exams, several short essays, one research paper.  

Special Note: SPAN 3300; SPAN 3430 highly recommended.

SPAN 4620 Hispanic Women Writers

Staff

This course will explore texts written by women in Spanish from the late Middle Ages to 1800.  The unifying theme will be the creation of feminist consciousness. Among the issues we will consider are how women claimed the authority to write or teach during periods when these activities were discouraged; female monasticism and mysticism and their relationship to self-actualization; the means by which women writers emulated, rejected or appropriated male-authored literary models; the development of a separate feminine literary tradition; Enlightenment feminism; and women’s awareness of gender roles as historically constructed. The course will be conducted in Spanish (see prerequisites).

Special Note: Spanish 3300 (or equivalent experience); highly recommended: at least one other literature or culture courses in Spanish at 3000 or 4000 level.

STS 2500-001(ReproTech) Science and Technology in Social and Global Context: Science Fiction & New Reproductive Technology

Berne

Human reproduction has long been the curiosity of technologists, the womb representing a mystery to both behold and control. Early in history physicians saw it as a source of evil and darkness, contrary to the existence of a brain. Now, it is the subject of sophisticated technological intervention. Related medical  "problems" as they are defined, have also been addressed by science itself, and the application of ‘technological fixes'. Human reproduction has also long been the subject of science fiction. Mary Shelly explored the urge to create life through the passions of Dr. Victor Frankenstein. The Handmaid's Tale portrays a collective, social controlling of female fertility.
This course begins with a discussion of birth, the body of woman and her biological capacity to bring forth new life. It then moves to the quandary of infertility, the reconstruction of parentage, and alternatives to conventional fertilization and gestation. Questions of how technology is used to address these matters, including the moral limits and unintended consequences of manipulating the reproduction process, are studied and explored through a variety of scholarly readings and documentary film. Science fiction is used to engage the moral imagination.